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PNS Daily Newscast - April 24, 2018 


Trump’s Secretary of State nominee gets a narrow thumbs up, but his Veteran’s Affairs nominee is put on hold. Also on our rundown: Protests against Wells Fargo set for Des Moines today; and cannabis advocates blame Florida officials for “reefer madness.”

Daily Newscasts

Gulf Oil Spill Disaster - Economic History in the Making?

May 4, 2010

PENSACOLA, Fla. - The leaking underwater oil well in the Gulf of Mexico is pumping out over a million gallons of crude per week. As the slick starts making its appearance off Florida and along the coast to New Orleans, those who depend on coastal businesses are beginning to realize their livelihoods are in jeopardy.

Marilyn Heiman, who directs the U.S. Arctic Program of the Pew Environment Group, helped work on economic recovery issues after the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. She predicts that the effects of this Gulf spill will be felt across the country as fishing and shrimping industries shut down. The Gulf supplies nearly half of the seafood consumed in the United States.

"This is going to be very big; it doesn't look like they are going to be able to control the well anytime soon. And so, it will be at least the size of the Exxon Valdez, I believe."

After the Exxon Valdez spill, fishing was shut down in Alaska's Prince William Sound. Heiman says the area has yet to recover economically, and it's been more than 20 years.

"This is what the Gulf Coast states and the fishermen that fish there are potentially facing, and a very large portion of our seafood comes from the Gulf of Mexico."

Volunteers are being mobilized all along the coastline from Pensacola to New Orleans to help deal with the massive amounts of oil threatening to wash ashore. The toll-free number for more information for those who want to help is 1-866-448-5816.

James Hudson, Public News Service - FL