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The Fawns are All Right

Photo: The Maryland Department of Natural Resources warns against approaching fawns. Photo credit: DNR
Photo: The Maryland Department of Natural Resources warns against approaching fawns. Photo credit: DNR
May 17, 2013

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – There's a deer baby boom happening in Maryland right now.

This is the time of year when most fawns are born, and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources is warning people not to approach or try to help them, even if the fawns appear to be alone.

DNR deer biologist George Timko says doe leave their fawns for lengths of time while they get food, but the fawns have natural protections.

"The doe leaves that fawn alone, relies on its camouflage spots to hide it from predators,” he explains. “And when they're born, she cleans the fawn and it's basically odorless."

Timko says well-meaning people sometimes feed the fawns cow's milk, which can make them very sick, and moving them means they might never be reunited with their mothers.

Timko adds people are finding and trying to help fawns all over the state, not just in one particular area.

"Deer are living in people's backyards in the suburbs,” he says. “And this is where it's happening – also, in some more rural areas across the state. Oftentimes, a farmer will find a fawn."

Timko advises if you find a fawn, leave it alone. If the fawn attempts to follow you, gently push on its shoulders until it lies down and then slowly walk away.


Alison Burns, Public News Service - MD