Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 25, 2018 


President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Gov. Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans, taking a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb is called out for “secret tax deals.”

Daily Newscasts

Climate Change in NH: A Matter of National Security?

PHOTO: Michael Breen, New Hampshire native and a former Army Captain who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, says many military and security leaders already take the threat of climate change very seriously. Photo courtesy of Truman National Security Project
PHOTO: Michael Breen, New Hampshire native and a former Army Captain who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, says many military and security leaders already take the threat of climate change very seriously. Photo courtesy of Truman National Security Project
July 10, 2013

CONCORD, N.H. - There's more to New Hampshire's changing climate than warmer winters, increased rainfall and severe weather events. Experts have said, in some ways, climate change also poses a threat to national security. New Hampshire native and former Army Capt. Michael Breen said many top military and security leaders are taking the matter extremely seriously.

"It threatens our national economy; it also threatens global stability," Breen said. "We know that a lot of the effects of climate change - population disruptions, food scarcity, flooding, extreme weather and so on - these act as accelerants of instability."

Breen added that besides the importance of protecting the coastlines, climate change poses a particular threat to New Hampshire's security, with the state's tradition of service to the National Guard and Reserves. He called President Obama's plans to fight climate change a good step in the right direction. These include setting the first-ever limits on emissions from coal-burning power plants, and a renewed effort to prepare the country for the effects of climate change.

The President's plans also call on the U.S. to lead global efforts to reduce carbon pollution. Breen said every nation has a stake in fixing the problem, but he stressed that the U.S. needs to be at the helm.

"We've seen far too often that if the United States does not lead on that world stage, nothing happens," Breen said. "We've got to step forward and lead. We may have other priorities here at home, but it's time to take leadership on this climate issue as well - we've got to."

Measures are also needed to reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil and move toward cleaner energy sources, including renewables and energy efficiency, Breen added.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - NH