Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to Congress. Also on our rundown: More evidence that rent prices are out of reach in many markets; Wisconsin counties brace for sulfide mining; and the Earth Day focus this weekend in North Dakota is on recycling.

Daily Newscasts

Survival Tip for WY Backcountry: Don't Worry About Food

PHOTO: Reality shows and the zombie-apocalypse trend are leading folks down the wrong path when it comes to survival skills, according to Michael Jarnevic (JAR-neh-vick), an Army Special Forces medic who teaches survival classes, most recently for the Sierra Club. Photo courtesy of Jarnevic
PHOTO: Reality shows and the zombie-apocalypse trend are leading folks down the wrong path when it comes to survival skills, according to Michael Jarnevic (JAR-neh-vick), an Army Special Forces medic who teaches survival classes, most recently for the Sierra Club. Photo courtesy of Jarnevic
July 29, 2013

CASPER, Wyo. - According to a backcountry survival-skills expert, you do not need to be an expert to survive. Michael Jarnevic is an Army Special Forces medic. He said TV reality shows have misled people when it comes to survival situations - situations that can happen quickly, not far from Wyoming cities and towns.

Jarnevic's insights: The first priorities are shelter, warmth and fire, followed by finding water and signaling for help. But what do most people do first? He has found that they waste time and energy focused on food.

"Human beings can live upwards to two months without food," he said. "It admittedly would not be a pleasant experience, but you could do it. But you could die within hours from hypothermia or lack of water, so those need to be your priorities."

Even when going on a day hike, he added, take a survival kit. Some of the items to include: fire starters, parachute cord, water-purification tablets, energy bars, cable saw, first aid kit, whistle, flashlight and cell phone.

Jarnevic has found that getting lost is the most common survival situation. Other factors include darkness, weather and an injury or illness. Health issues are worst-case scenarios, he warned.

"It doesn't have to be that far into the backcountry to have something really go south fast," he warned. "Say, for instance, you're out hiking alone and you take a fall and you break your leg. Suddenly, immediately, you're in a survival situation."

Jarnevic has taught classes in the inland Pacific Northwest for the Sierra Club.

Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - WY