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PNS Daily Newscast - February 23, 2018 


As the NRA doubles down on "good guys with guns," the Broward County Sheriff admits an armed deputy did not engage with the Parkland school shooter. Also on our nationwide rundown: workers across the nation will spend part of their weekend defending the American Dream; and a study says the Lone Star State is distorting Texas history lessons.

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Stories of Immigration and Deportation – Amanda

Oscar Perez is in the U.S. without permission, but since coming to this country at 17 he's built a life and business that presently employs three. PHOTO of Oscar and his children at home, courtesy of Amanda Perez.
Oscar Perez is in the U.S. without permission, but since coming to this country at 17 he's built a life and business that presently employs three. PHOTO of Oscar and his children at home, courtesy of Amanda Perez.
August 23, 2013

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Behind all the immigration debates and statistics are real people, such as Amanda Paris Perez.

Perez was born and raised in Rogers and still lives there, taking care of her two young children and helping her husband, Oscar, run a small construction firm.

Oscar slipped into the country when he was 17, and over the last decade and a half, he's slowly worked to build a life and a business in Rogers.

A few years ago he had a brush with the law – a DUI and a minor drug charge. His wife says he's cleared his record, but it still looks like he'll be deported.

She says losing him will tear their family apart.

"My husband cries, he goes in the garage every night and cries,” she says. “And the kids are, like, 'Well, what's dad doing,' and I have to lie to them and tell them he's working on something.

“But the day he doesn't come home they're going to ask questions, and I don't know what answers to give them."

Oscar Perez is to report for deportation next week.

Perez Roofing and Masonry has three employees, sometimes more. Amanda says the company will shut down without her husband, but she's also willing to lose it to keep him in the country.

She says they'll fight to keep Oscar here, calling members of Congress and putting up a petition on Facebook, anything that might work.

"I tell my lawyer, 'Let's file another appeal, I don't care what it takes,'” she says. “I'll put my house up for sale. I'll lose my business. Whatever it takes, as long as he's here with me."

Since he entered the country illegally, Oscar Perez can't qualify for citizenship as the law now stands.

Amanda says her husband worked hard to clear his record of the DUI and drug charge, in the hope that he might at least avoid being deported. She says he now has a spotless criminal history and should be able to stay here.

"My husband's charges were expunged,” she says. “He did everything the state of Arkansas asked him to do, above and beyond. And I'm just pleading to anybody that is willing to help or can help, to help us."





Dan Heyman, Public News Service - AR