Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 24, 2018 


Trump’s Secretary of State nominee gets a narrow thumbs up, but his Veteran’s Affairs nominee is put on hold. Also on our rundown: Protests against Wells Fargo set for Des Moines today; and cannabis advocates blame Florida officials for “reefer madness.”

Daily Newscasts

Gov’s Claim to Reduce Childhood Hunger Fact-checked

PHOTO: Gov. Martin O'Malley's State of the State address claims: "Together, we have reduced childhood hunger," is applauded by Marylandís No Kid Hungry Campaign. Photo courtesy of USDA.gov
PHOTO: Gov. Martin O'Malley's State of the State address claims: "Together, we have reduced childhood hunger," is applauded by Marylandís No Kid Hungry Campaign. Photo courtesy of USDA.gov
January 28, 2014

BALTIMORE - "Together, we have reduced childhood hunger," Governor Martin O'Malley said during his State of the State address, and according to Anna Mudd, project manager with Maryland's No Kid Hungry Campaign, it's 100 percent true. Part of the proof is that the percentage of pupils who received free or reduced-price school lunches, who also got school breakfasts, has risen from 46 percent in 2009 to 57 percent.

That's progress she credits to the Governor and Legislature boosting funding for the Maryland Meals for Achievement school breakfast program.

"He has also helped us form a coalition of private and nonprofit organizations and groups of people together, and we meet every other month," Mudd said.

She said ending hunger takes not only investments from the public and private sectors but also creativity and new partnerships.

Mudd pointed out that, even though Maryland is considered a wealthy state, 19 percent of children struggle with hunger every day.

"That's why increasing breakfast participation at school is so important," she said. "That's why increasing participating in summer meals program and the after-school program is so important. Hopefully, we can end childhood hunger."

The Governor supports even more funding for school breakfasts next fiscal year.

Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - MD