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PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to congress. Also on our rundown: more evidence that the rent is too, damn, high; Marathon County braces for sulfide mining; and the focus on recycling this weekend for Earth Day in North Dakota.

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Report: NH Economy Headed “Underwater?”

PHOTO: Coastal storm damage, like the destruction pictured here in the wake of Superstorm Sandy, will become more frequent as sea levels rise through the remainder of the century in the Northeast, according to a new report. Photo courtesy of the Risky Business Project.
PHOTO: Coastal storm damage, like the destruction pictured here in the wake of Superstorm Sandy, will become more frequent as sea levels rise through the remainder of the century in the Northeast, according to a new report. Photo courtesy of the Risky Business Project.
July 1, 2014

CONCORD, N.H. - While the Northeast is expected to experience an increase in temperatures and more extreme, hot days through the remainder of the century, a new study says the major climate impact to the region will come from rising sea levels and their effect on nearby coastal infrastructure.

The report from the Risky Business Project says the New England coast will likely experience a sea-level rise of two to four feet by the year 2100. Matt Lewis, communications director for the Risky Business Project, says Hurricane Andrew and Superstorm Sandy were huge wake-up calls for the region's insurance industry and real estate markets.

"There's quite a bit of property along the Atlantic coast that's at risk in the time frame of the next 20 years, and a significant amount of property will slowly, inevitably go below sea level," says Lewis. "But keep in mind storm surges during hurricanes come on top of whatever sea level rise you have."

The report notes if nothing is done, additional fluctuations in the elevation of the sea above those projected will likely increase average annual property losses from hurricanes and other coastal storms in New Hampshire to 76 million dollars by 2039. Coastlines are critical to the New England economy, with major cities and major industries on the water - from Boston Harbor to the fisheries in Portland, Maine.

Lewis says temperatures in the Northeast will rise, but without as much of an impact as other regions. He notes, however, that extreme heat will affect the performance of climate-reliant energy systems.

"When the rivers and water that's available to cool generation facilities become too hot, you're no longer able to run it through a cooling tower," says Lewis. "So increasing temperatures will also affect energy system reliability."

The Risky Business Project is a joint partnership of former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Bloomberg Philanthropies; the Paulson Institute, founded by former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson; and TomKat Charitable Trust.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH