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PNS Daily Newscast - April 27, 2018 


A historic summit between North and South Korea. Also on the Friday rundown: teachers continue their fight for funding; the EPA chief grilled on Capitol Hill; and remembering those who’ve lost their lives on the job.

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Report Says Nature Offers Best Flood Defense Against Next "Sandy"

PHOTO: A University of Connecticut researcher places equipment in Long Island Sound to measure temperature, sea level pressure and waves to create maps which will predict coastal flooding. Photo credit: Mary M. Howard-Strobel.
PHOTO: A University of Connecticut researcher places equipment in Long Island Sound to measure temperature, sea level pressure and waves to create maps which will predict coastal flooding. Photo credit: Mary M. Howard-Strobel.
October 28, 2014

GROTON, Conn. - A new report from the National Wildlife Federation suggests some of the best resources for preventing major flooding in a future superstorm like 2012's Sandy can be found right outside.

The report says actions can be taken now to shore up natural defenses that will greatly improve the safety and resiliency of communities threatened by the growing risks of floods and hurricanes, especially as water levels continue to rise and weather grows more unstable from climate change.

Rebecca French, director of community engagement at the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation, says they are in the process of a mapping project that will provide more accurate information about sea level rise and flooding patterns - right down to the town and municipality level.

"In order for towns to make better-informed decisions about how to adapt to changes in sea level rise and include precipitation as a result of climate change, they need to know where that flooding is going to be occurring," she says.

French says her team will incorporate the effects of rivers and the details of Connecticut's coastal shape into the new, more accurate maps, which should be ready by the fall of 2015.

New England suffered more than $390 million in damage when Superstorm Sandy came ashore two years ago this week.

Collin O'Mara, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation, says when it comes to putting up a strong, protective infrastructure, Mother Nature really does know best.

"When a storm comes through and you have healthy wetlands and other marsh plants, their ability to absorb the energy from storms to protect communities directly adjacent to them is really a sight to be seen," says O'Mara.

The report recommends better protections for coastal areas by strengthening the Clean Water Act, as well as improvements to federal flood insurance policy that would incentivize protective efforts.

The full Surviving Climate Change with Natural Defenses report is available at the National Wildlife Federation website.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - CT