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PNS Daily Newscast - April 19, 2018 


A contentious Farm Bill heads to U.S. House for debate. Also on our rundown: gaps cited in protections for small-business employees and nonprofit volunteers; plus power out for much of Puerto Rico; and some warning signs, that increased youth activism may not correspond to voter turnout.

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McCain: CIA Interrogations "Stained Our National Honor"

PHOTO: U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has been outspoken in his disgust with the CIA interrogation tactics used following the Sept. 11 attacks. He commented about the release of a Senate Intelligence Committee report on the CIA's so-called enhanced interrogation techniques. Photo courtesy of Sen. McCain's office.
PHOTO: U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has been outspoken in his disgust with the CIA interrogation tactics used following the Sept. 11 attacks. He commented about the release of a Senate Intelligence Committee report on the CIA's so-called enhanced interrogation techniques. Photo courtesy of Sen. McCain's office.
December 10, 2014

WASHINGTON - Sen. John McCain is among those condemning the CIA's "enhanced interrogation techniques" used on some terrorist suspects following the Sept. 11 attacks.

McCain, R-Ariz., was among several lawmakers who spoke on the Senate floor following the release Tuesday of a report from the Senate Intelligence Committee on CIA interrogation practices.

"Some of these practices amounted to torture, as a reasonable person would define it," McCain said, "especially, but not only, the practice of waterboarding, which is a mock execution and an exquisite form of torture."

McCain said the report also shows that waterboarding and sleep-deprivation practices did not reveal any useful information about possible terrorist plots.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, said that from the president to people on the street, the CIA provided misleading information, claiming that its program was successful.

"The CIA," she said, "provided extensive, inaccurate information about the program and its effectiveness to the White House, the Department of Justice, Congress, the CIA Inspector General, the media and the American public."

In a written statement, President Obama said the report's findings are the reason he ended the CIA's detention and interrogation program shortly after taking office in 2009. He added that one of the strengths that makes America exceptional is "our willingness to openly confront our past, face our imperfections, make changes and do better."

The report is online at intelligence.senate.gov.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - AZ