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President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Gov. Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans, taking a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb is called out for “secret tax deals.”

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In Utah, Nation, CDC's Anti-Smoking Campaign Is On

PHOTO: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has kicked off its new Tips From Former Smokers campaign which addresses the health risks of smoking and the myths of e-cigarettes. Photo credit: Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
PHOTO: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has kicked off its new Tips From Former Smokers campaign which addresses the health risks of smoking and the myths of e-cigarettes. Photo credit: Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
March 30, 2015

SALT LAKE CITY - People in Utah and around the U.S. are being reminded of the health risks of smoking and also myths about e-cigarettes in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's new Tips From Former Smokers campaign. CDC Senior Medical Officer Dr. Tim McAfee says vaping, the use of e-cigarettes, is being aggressively marketed as a way to help smokers quit, although the research so far shows it does not help.

In addition, he cites research showing that reducing the amount of traditional smoking by using e-cigs doesn't help, either.

"The 2010 Surgeon General's Report found that fewer cigarettes per day does not reduce cardiovascular disease and the only way to stop the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is to quit smoking completely," McAfee says.

The anti-smoking campaign features television and radio spots, online images and video and print components bearing testimonials from former smokers dealing with major health problems and directs smokers to call the QuitLine (1-800-QUIT-NOW).

'Julia' is one of the former smokers in this year's campaign. She details her life after colon cancer, which she connects to more than 30 years of smoking, starting as a teenager.

"It wasn't just about the physical pain and suffering I endured, it was also the fear and sadness I saw in my family that hurt almost more than the cancer itself," she says.

Other former smokers sharing their stories talk about rectal cancer, lung cancer and age-related macular degeneration.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - UT