Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 20, 2018 


A day in court for the alleged Florida school shooter. Also on our nationwide rundown: a 24-hour hotline "reignites" to support immigrants; and a new study finds prescription drugs in the Hudson River, from Troy all the way to New York City.

Daily Newscasts

Do You Know a Volunteer Worthy of an Award?

PHOTO: Thousands of Nevadans volunteer at food banks, hospitals, animal shelters, and schools each year, and AARP Nevada is seeking nominees for its highest honor given for volunteerism. Photo courtesy of Douglas County, Nevada.
PHOTO: Thousands of Nevadans volunteer at food banks, hospitals, animal shelters, and schools each year, and AARP Nevada is seeking nominees for its highest honor given for volunteerism. Photo courtesy of Douglas County, Nevada.
July 2, 2015

LAS VEGAS – Nevadans who give their time and talents to help others can be nominated for an award that recognizes the positive contribution of volunteerism.

Hilarie Grey with AARP Nevada says the 2015 AARP Nevada Andrus Award for Community Service – named after AARP founder Dr. Ethel Percy Andrus – is the organization's highest honor for people working to help others. A panel will consider the overall impact of each nominee's contribution.

"How innovative is the volunteer work, how dedicated has the person been to their cause?" she asks. "Is it something that's making a difference in the community? Does it inspire other people to volunteer?"

Only one Nevada individual or couple is selected each year. The nomination deadline is Friday, July 31.

Grey says nominations can be made online at the AARP Nevada website, at www.aarp.org/nv. Nominees must be age 50 and older, and don't have to be AARP members to be eligible. The winner will receive the award at a celebration event later this year.

Last year's Andrus Award winner, Don Floresta, helped create a patient and family advocacy program at the St. Rose Dominican Hospitals in the Las Vegas area. Grey says he is just one example of the huge contribution made by thousands of volunteers in the state.

"Volunteers in Nevada play a lot of different roles," she says. "There's an economic benefit, they're the backbone of the health care system, they're helping to get animals adopted. They're doing all kinds of different work in the community."

Grey says others typically nominate volunteers for the award, since most are not seeking recognition for themselves.

Troy Wilde/Tommy Hough, Public News Service - NV