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Video Guide to Race for KY Governor

Money for retirement and time to care for family are two issues a new video-voter guide asks Kentucky's candidates for governor to address. Credit Greg Stotelmyer.
Money for retirement and time to care for family are two issues a new video-voter guide asks Kentucky's candidates for governor to address. Credit Greg Stotelmyer.
September 14, 2015

FRANKFORT, Ky. - When Kentuckians go to the polls Nov. 3 to elect a new governor, better than 60 percent of them will be 50 or older. That prediction from Pete Jeffries, AARP's national engagement director. Jeffries says older voters are often concerned they don't have enough time and they don't have enough money.

"It's incumbent on the candidates to talk directly to those voters on what their ideas and solutions are, particularly on care-giving issues and financial security issues," he says. "Because, people really want to know the meat and potatoes of what they're going to get in their next governor."

AARP has just released a non-partisan video voters guide that provides background on those issues and answers from the two candidates, Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway. You can access the guide on the AARP Kentucky web site (www.aarp.org/ky)

Jeffries says there are 648,000 family caregivers in Kentucky, which makes that a huge issue for many voters.

"When you're taking care of someone else, whether they're younger or older than you, it is a time issue," he says. "But, it also has a financial impact on a family. This all comes back to the pocketbook."

AARP has long advocated for finding more ways to help older Kentuckians remain in their own homes rather than go into a nursing home.

Another issue spotlighted in the voter guide is many middle-income Kentuckians have not saved enough for their retirement. This is AARP state president Jim Kimbrough.

"We estimate almost 790,000 working Kentuckians don't have access to retirement accounts through their employer," says Kimbrough. "So, we want to have that option available to people."

Kimbrough says AARP has urged the state to create a framework through which small businesses could offer their employees a way to contribute to their retirement.

Greg Stotelmyer , Public News Service - KY