Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 24, 2017 


On our nationwide rundown; the Pentagon attempts to clear the air on the ambush of U.S. troops; high marks for the nation’s capital city in meeting the needs of immigrant children; and we’ll tell you why experts are encouraging expanded vision screening of kids.

Daily Newscasts

Three Pipelines Would Cross Two Miles Of Creek, Opponents Want Consolidation

Opponents are calling for a comprehensive plan to reduce the impact of four huge proposed natural gas pipelines on national forest land and endangered species. Credit: Dominion Pipeline Monitoring Coalition.
Opponents are calling for a comprehensive plan to reduce the impact of four huge proposed natural gas pipelines on national forest land and endangered species. Credit: Dominion Pipeline Monitoring Coalition.
September 28, 2015

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – A boom in gas pipeline building means three could all cross one Doddridge County Creek at the same spot.

Opponents say pipeline review and approval should be consolidated to reduce the pipelines’ impact.

Critics say the pipeline companies are racing to lock in eastern markets. But if the companies get their way, one pipeline now under construction and two other proposed lines would all cross within one two-mile stretch of Meathouse Fork.

Rick Webb, a retired environmental scientist and coordinator of the Dominion Pipeline Monitoring Coalition, says regulators have already cited the 36-inch Stonewall Gathering Pipeline for erosion and sediment problems.

"Within a two mile stretch, this pipeline will cross this stream along with the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline and the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline, both of which are even larger," he points out.

The pipelines would cost billions of dollars and would run for hundreds of miles.

Industry officials say the pipelines are essential to break a bottleneck in bringing the gas to market.

The companies say the pipelines would mean lower prices, thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in added tax revenue.

Energy companies have applied to build more than twice as many miles of pipeline this year than last.

Webb says federal regulators should require what's known as a programmatic or regional environmental impact statement.

He says that would mean writing a coherent plan, rather than each company pushing to build as fast as it can.

Webb adds the energy industry might be able to use fewer pipelines, put several in the same right-of-way, or use an existing right-of-way.

He says that makes sense since the terrain is especially steep, and vulnerable.

"We need to take a comprehensive look at pipeline development in the region, and do some coherent type of planning,” he stresses. “Rather building three separate corridors just within two-mile areas."

U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia has suggested consolidation, as has the EPA.

A group of nearly 30 environmental and community groups has written to the U.S. Forest Service, arguing for a regional environmental impact statement.

Four of the pipelines would cross national forest land and according to the Forest Service, at least one path would likely put endangered salamanders at risk.

Dan Heyman, Public News Service - WV