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The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to Congress. Also on our rundown: More evidence that rent prices are out of reach in many markets; Wisconsin counties brace for sulfide mining; and the Earth Day focus this weekend in North Dakota is on recycling.

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Quit, Screen, Give: It's Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Lung cancer is the top cancer killer of men and women in Wisconsin, and the American Lung Association says lung cancer diagnoses have nearly doubled among women in the past 37 years. Credit: CDC.gov
Lung cancer is the top cancer killer of men and women in Wisconsin, and the American Lung Association says lung cancer diagnoses have nearly doubled among women in the past 37 years. Credit: CDC.gov
November 2, 2015

MILWAUKEE – Lung cancer is the top cancer killer of both women and men, taking the lives of almost twice as many women as any other cancer.

More than 1,900 Wisconsin women will be diagnosed with lung cancer in 2015.

Anyone can get lung cancer, even people who have never smoked.

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and Dr. Elizabeth Gore, medical director of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Medical College of Wisconsin, points out people are largely unaware of how deadly lung cancer is.

"No, absolutely not,” she states. “I think there's so much interest and publicity surrounding the concerns regarding breast cancer and I think it really overshadows which is the more concerning statistic – that lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women."

According to the American Lung Association, lung cancer diagnoses have nearly doubled among women in the past 37 years, yet only 1 percent of women cite lung cancer as a top concern.

To help raise awareness about lung cancer, the American Lung Association has launched Lung Force at lungforce.org to help women in the fight against the disease.

Early diagnosis is a key to fighting lung cancer, but right now only 17 percent of lung cancer cases among women are diagnosed early.

Early diagnosis allows for a greater range of treatment options. And Gore says there is another important issue.

"The biggest need is preventing tobacco use and people not starting to smoke and people who are smoking need to quit smoking,” she stresses. “That is by far the most important thing that we can do to decrease the problem that we're seeing with lung cancer."

Gore says lung cancer screening is a potential lifesaver, because it can detect lung cancer before there are symptoms, when it is easier to treat.

Raising money for lung cancer research is critical to beating the disease, according to Gore, but she says there are other things people can do to help fight the disease.

"People need to be well-informed and also be willing to discuss and consider participating in clinical trials,” she explains. “That's really where we learn how to manage the cancer, get a better understanding of it, and improve our success rate in treating it."

More ideas on how to help can be found at lung.org.



Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI