Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 25, 2018 


President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Governor Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans to take a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb called out for “secret deals.”

Daily Newscasts

Community-Owned Biodiesel Plant Opens in January

Construction is nearing completion on the Northeast Biodiesel plant, the first community-owned biodiesel refinery in New England. (Co-op Power)
Construction is nearing completion on the Northeast Biodiesel plant, the first community-owned biodiesel refinery in New England. (Co-op Power)
December 14, 2015

CONCORD, N.H. - Next month, a new plant in New England should start producing clean, biodiesel fuel manufactured from recycled cooking oil that comes from restaurants across the region, including New Hampshire.

Co-op Power CEO Lynn Benander says the plant will take cooking oil waste from restaurants, schools and institutions and convert it into millions of gallons of a clean source of energy that works both in vehicles and for heating homes.

"The way biodiesel is clean is that it cuts the carbon emissions by 86 percent, cuts down particulate emissions over diesel fuel," says Beander. "So, it is a clean alternative to the fossil fuels that we're using to stay warm and get around."

Benander says the Northeast Biodiesel Plant in Greenfield, Massachusetts, isn't the first refinery of this type in the region, but it will be the first that is locally-owned. She says a big reason Co-op Power signed onto the project is that there has been very little access to this type of clean fuel in the region.

Co-op Power's Isaac Baker, director of community shared solar programs, says in the Granite State, more than a half-dozen restaurants in the Manchester area are already signed up to provide cooking oil for Northeast Biodiesel.

"You pay per gallon for people to give you their waste vegetable oil, so we are in that market," says Baker. "But we also, unlike other people in the market, have this biodiesel that we can offer at a discounted price in various cases, depending on the price that they offer us for the feed-stock on the input side."

Benander says there currently is not much access to biofuel for truckers in the region and providing it will make a major difference in the long run.

"It is the only clean alternative for trucks and buses, and construction equipment and farm equipment," says Beander. "It plays a very, very important role in those industries."

The co-op is investing $3.5 million to build the plant and says the 14 people who end up working there will also have shares in the cooperative. A list of participating Granite State restaurants is on the Co-op Power website.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH