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President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Gov. Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans, taking a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb is called out for “secret tax deals.”

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MN Environmentalists Ask that Next President be a "Great Lakes President"

New research shows Great Lakes voters would be less likely to support a presidential candidate who plans to cut restoration funds for Lake Superior and the other Great Lakes. (iStockphoto)
New research shows Great Lakes voters would be less likely to support a presidential candidate who plans to cut restoration funds for Lake Superior and the other Great Lakes. (iStockphoto)
September 21, 2016

ST. PAUL, Minn. - Whether the winner is Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, a broad coalition is hoping that whoever takes the White House is a "Great Lakes president."

At the 12th annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference in Sandusky this week, advocates are calling on both campaigns to make protecting the Great Lakes a presidential priority. Groups including the Minnesota Environmental Partnership say Lake Superior is the most threatened of the five Great Lakes.

Steve Morse, the partnership's executive director, spoke at last year's event. This year, he's hoping the candidates will continue the work of previous presidents.

"It's an issue not just for those of us in the Great Lakes Basin, but actually for the whole country," he said. "And so, the president plays a key in role in really kicking off and maintaining this Great Lakes restoration work."

Great Lakes protection has received support from President Obama and former President George W. Bush as well as both Republicans and Democrats in Congress. Representatives from the Clinton and Trump campaigns will speak at the conference on Thursday during a campaign forum, to be broadcast live on Facebook at facebook.com/healthylakes.

Todd Ambs, campaign director for the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition, wants the next president to support the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which has spurred nearly 3,000 projects in the region over the past seven years.

"We've really seen a lot of tremendous progress on some of the challenges facing the Great Lakes," he said. "We have much more work to do. There's no question that there's significant challenges that remain, but we're really seen some good progress."

A 2016 poll of voters in Great Lakes states found that more than six in 10 strongly support continued funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. It also revealed that voters would be less likely to vote for a presidential candidate who threatens to cut federal restoration funds.

The poll is online at healthylakes.org.

Brandon Campbell, Public News Service - MN