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In our rundown spotlight today: at least 13 are dead in Barcelona after a driver ran his van into pedestrians; a researcher examines ways to resolve racial inequality; and a new study finds Latinos will fuel a quarter of America's economic growth in 2020.

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Moms Turn to Colo. Governor After Trump Rolls Back Climate Regulations

Health experts say children are especially at risk for developing asthma and other breathing problems exacerbated by air pollution. (Pixabay)
Health experts say children are especially at risk for developing asthma and other breathing problems exacerbated by air pollution. (Pixabay)
March 29, 2017

DENVER – President Donald Trump's executive order rolling back climate regulations, including the EPA's Clean Power Plan, isn't getting rave reviews from Colorado parents.

Jen Clanahan with Colorado Moms Know Best says the plan helped her sleep better at night knowing the air would be getting cleaner, and she believes the order proves Trump is willing to put the interests of fossil-fuel companies before kids.

She adds moms across the state will be counting on Governor John Hickenlooper now more than ever.

"Colorado has a great history of coming together, doing what's best for the state and our residents," she said. "We need him to continue that leadership role; we really need him step up and protect our air, and our children and our Colorado way of life."

Colorado set goals to reduce climate pollution surpassing those in the Clean Power Plan, and Governor Hickenlooper has said he wants the state to boast the cleanest air in the country. During a signing ceremony at the EPA on Tuesday, Trump called regulations created during the Obama administration "federal overreach" and promised a new era of job creation.

One goal of the Clean Power Plan was to cut more than a billion tons of carbon emissions, mostly from power plants, by 2030, a move the EPA estimated would result in $55 billion worth of public-health benefits.

Clanahan says kids are especially at risk for developing asthma and other breathing problems exacerbated by air pollution because their lungs are still developing.

"We want them to be able to get outdoors and play," she added. "But you know when you're exercising, you're breathing in more air, you're breathing faster. And so, it's even more important that that air be clean air."

Clanahan adds there's plenty to worry about when it comes to kids - how they're doing in school, whether they're making friends or eating healthy food - and parents shouldn't have to question the quality of the air they're breathing.

Eric Galatas, Public News Service - CO