News By Region

  • Midwest
  • Northeast
  • Southeast
  • Southwest
  • West
  • News By Topic

    Newscasts

    PNS Daily News - December 22, 20140 


    A variety issues to start the week on our nationwide rundown including; the shooter is reported to have bragged before he assassinated a pair of NYPD officers; when pigs fly-a drone captures rare images of North Carolina pig farms; and a caution to Santa’s helpers, lotto tickets can be worse than coal for stocking stuffers.

Toxics

PHOTO: Site Project Manager Jeff Brubaker (right) examines a metal parts treater, part of the huge plant that is expected to begin destroying 523 tons of chemical agents by 2018, stored at the Blue Grass Army Depot. Photo courtesy Blue Grass Chemical Activity.

RICHMOND, Ky. – The U.S. has destroyed 90 percent of its chemical weapons – but thousands of aging rockets, laced with deadly nerve agents, remain in storage near Richmond. The Blue Grass Army Depot holds 523 tons of chemical agent, and will be the last of the country's nine storage si ...Read More

Photo: Devries captured images like this one with his camera equipped drone, which flew over several North Carolina pig farms which supply hogs to Smithfield. Photo courtesy: Devries

KENANSVILLE, N.C. – A documentary filmmaker calls it alarming – the birds-eye view he recorded of some large North Carolina pig farms. Mark Devries used a drone to capture the images of lagoons of pig waste at a number of facilities, all of which supply pigs to Smithfield, the world's ...Read More

PHOTO: New York Acting Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker and Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens presented Gov. Cuomo and his Cabinet with their reports recommending a continued ban on fracking for natural gas. Photo Credit: Office of the Governor.

ALBANY, N.Y. - In a long-awaited announcement, the administration of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday ruled the potential health and environmental risks of fracking for natural gas are too great and not enough is known about them to allow it in New York. In extending a de facto ban on using ...Read More

MAP: A recent study identified 29 coal-ash sites statewide. Environmental advocates hope new regulations expected this week will help keep them in check. Map courtesy of Michigan Clean Water Action.

LANSING, Mich. - New federal regulations expected this week could change the way Michigan and other states deal with coal ash, which environmental advocates say is long overdue. Coal ash is the byproduct of burning coal and contains poisonous chemicals such as arsenic, lead and mercury, which are k ...Read More

PHOTO: Even with all of Wisconsin's rivers, streams and lakes, some communities are in near crisis because of a lack of groundwater. The Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters says it will make groundwater protection its top goal in 2015. Photo courtesy of Clean Wisconsin.

MADISON, Wis. - "A few small steps forward." That's how Anne Sayers, program director for the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters, describes what's been accomplished this year to help protect Wisconsin's environment. Sayers said 2014 brought renewed citizen involvement in the Badger State, with ...Read More

PHOTO: Mounds of coal ash are seen at a disposal site in Jefferson County, located near a residential area. Environmental and public health groups are anticipating first-ever EPA restrictions that classify coal ash as a hazardous substance. Photo credit: Thomas Pearce.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Federal rules about the storage and disposal of coal ash are expected from the Environmental Protection Agency this week. Kentucky is "in the center of the storm" about public health risks caused by coal ash, a toxic byproduct created when coal-fired power plants generate electric ...Read More

PHOTO: Nevadans are being encouraged to test for the potentially deadly radon gas, which research shows is at an unsafe level in one in four homes in the Silver State. Photo courtesy of the University of Nevada-Reno.

CARSON CITY, Nev. – Deadly radon gas is found at an unsafe level in one in four Nevada homes, but residents can get a free test kit that could end up saving a life, according to Jamie Roice-Gomes, radon education coordinator at the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. Roice-Gomes poin ...Read More

PHOTO: A new report finds the amount of gas drilled on federal leases in North Dakota that's royalty-free, consumed or flared by operators, is equal to more than 40 percent of the total volume sold. Photo credit: Merlin/Flickr.

BISMARCK, N.D. - The state's natural gas and oil boom is bringing in the dollars, but a new report says North Dakota and the nation are missing out on millions due to decades-old rules for drilling on federal lands. Ryan Alexander, president with Taxpayers for Common Sense, says their study found $3 ...Read More

1 of 106 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »

Toxics by State