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    PNS Daily News - June 24, 20160 


    In our wrap-up of today’s top news, Great Britain has voted to leave the European Union, the Supreme Court issues major rulings on immigration and affirmative action, and the world’s biggest swimming lesson aims at preventing drowning.

Water

The Altoona Campus Aquatic Park is one of several locations participating in the World's Largest Swimming Lesson. (Iowa Department of Public Health)

ALTOONA, Iowa – Swimming lessons can reduce the risk of drowning by 88 percent among children aged one to four. To cap off Drowning Prevention Week, the Iowa Department of Public Health is offering the World's Largest Swimming Lesson today in Altoona, as part of a nationwide program. "They ...Read More

Methane emissions from hydraulic fracturing operations contribute to climate change. (Joshua Doubek/Wikimedia)

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Methane is a potent greenhouse gas leaked by hydraulic fracturing and other oil and gas production. And a new report from the Center for American Progress pinpoints the who's who of methane pollution in Ohio and throughout the Appalachian Basin. The Center says 11 companie ...Read More

The EPA has not finalized methane emission rules for exiting sources. (Gerry Dincher/Flickr)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Methane is a potent greenhouse gas leaked by hydraulic fracturing and other oil and gas production. And a new report from the Center for American Progress pinpoints the who's who of methane pollution in Pennsylvania and throughout the Appalachian Basin. The Center says 11 ...Read More

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette announced a civil lawsuit in the Flint Water Crisis. (Pixabay)<br /><br />

LANSING, Mich. – Hiring private companies for government work is not a panacea, according to some groups in reaction to the latest lawsuit filed in the Flint water crisis. The civil suit announced Wednesday by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette alleges two firms hired to help mitigate t ...Read More

Urban heat islands, such as the city of Madison, affect the growing season and wildlife, according to a new University of Wisconsin study. (UW-William Graf)

MADISON, Wis. -- Urban-dwelling plants typically get a head start on the growing season compared with their rural counterparts because of the urban heat-island effect, which causes cities to be warmer than the surrounding countryside. According to researcher Samuel Zipper of the University of Wisco ...Read More

Agricultural runoff is the biggest source of nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. (Nicholas/Wikimedia Commons)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Pennsylvania is falling behind in its efforts to clean up water flowing into the Chesapeake Bay. Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia are supposed to achieve 60 percent of court ordered Chesapeake Bay pollution reduction goals by 2017. But according to Harry Campbell, exec ...Read More

The federal government has denied permission to build a hydroelectric dam project on the Bear River. (Kevin Lewis, Idaho Rivers United)

PRESTON, Idaho - A nearly 14-year battle to stop plans for a hydroelectric dam on the Bear River near Preston is over, after a federal decision on the project on Thursday. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied the application by Twin Lakes Canal Co. to build a 10-megawatt dam in an area p ...Read More

The green swirls of water seen here in the Chowan River are an example of the impact of too much nutrients that can occur in North Carolina waters. (Heather Deck, Pamlico-Tar River Foundation)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Agriculture is big business in North Carolina, and while the farms across the state add to the economy and resources, the waste generated in the form of animal waste and fertilizer runoff has the potential to impact the state's water quality. For the past 20 years, regulati ...Read More

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