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PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AR: Livable Wages/Working Families

Experts say low-income working families could be hit the hardest if Arkansas lowers the income requirements for the state's Medicaid program. (Moore/GettyImages)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Arkansas health officials are proposing significant cuts to the state's Medicaid program by rolling back the income requirements for eligibility. But some experts say that’s against the rules. The state currently is awaiting an answer from the federal Health and Human Se

House Speaker Paul Ryan explains the American Health Care Act at a news conference last month. (Somodevilla/GettyImages)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – As health care advocates evaluate the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA), many are deeply concerned about its use of “high-risk pools” to cut costs. The pools would take the sickest Americans out of the insurance marketplace and put them under a separate

State and federal proposals to cut Medicaid have many low-income Arkansas families concerned about losing access to affordable health care. (GettyImages)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Low-income families in Arkansas have seen significant improvements in health care under the state's expanded Medicaid program, but proposed changes could put those gains in jeopardy. A new study says states, including Arkansas, that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable

Thousands of Arkansas residents could lose out on Medicaid coverage if state lawmakers approve a freeze on new enrollments.  (AMRImage/iStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – With an estimated 330,000 people enrolled in Arkansas's expanded Medicaid program, state lawmakers are now taking steps to freeze enrollment. The state adopted a plan that uses Medicaid funds to buy health care from the insurance marketplace for those eligible, and the nu

Arkansas schools are ranked seventh in the country for the number of low-income students in the School Breakfast Program. (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The annual School Breakfast Scorecard ranks Arkansas seventh in the nation for the number of low-income students who participate in both breakfast and lunch programs. The report from the Food Research and Action Center charts the progress of its national push to increase t

The AARP Foundation's Tax-Aide Program is available at 21 sites in Arkansas to prepare tax returns for people who can't afford professional help. (bernardasv/IStockphoto)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- The federal income tax filing deadline is April 18, and if you can't afford professional help with your tax return, free assistance is available. The AARP Foundation's Tax-Aide Program offers no-cost services in Arkansas preparing federal and state tax returns. Kim Labbate, a

In Arkansas, African Americans' median incomes are 42 percent lower than whites'. (Brandis Griffith Friedman)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - If current trends continue, a new study says it would take the average African-American family 228 years to accumulate the amount of wealth the average white family has today. It will take the average Latino family 84 years to do the same. The "Ever-Growing Gap," a report by the

Arkansas residents are being urged to take a stand about the future of Social Security. (AARP.org)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Nearly 674,000 people in Arkansas collect Social Security benefits; that's one out of every four state residents. Advocates say with so many relying on it to make ends meet, it's crucial to know what each presidential candidate will do to make sure the program is funded into the

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