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PNS Daily Newscast - January 18, 2018  


The clock is ticking on a stopgap budget bill. Also our our nationwide rundown: a tipping rule change could cost women billions of dollars; and the State of Ohio considers protections for "Revenge Porn" victims.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CA: Family/Father Issues

50,000 California DACA recipients are parents to U.S.-born children. (avidcreative/iStockphotos)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Almost 250 California businesses and children's groups have just sent a joint letter to the state's members of Congress, urging them to pass the Dream Act, which would give certain undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children a work permit and

A new report shows that Asian and white children in California score significantly higher on measures of well-being compared to American Indian, Latino and African American kids. (Latino Outdoors)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – California has improved child well-being significantly since 2014 - but still needs to shrink the severe racial disparities that persist, according to a new report. The "2017 Race for Results" report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation comes out every three years and the la

A new report recommends ways that California policymakers could improve outcomes for the state's children and toddlers. (ulkare/istockphoto)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Less than 10 percent of California toddlers and infants who are eligible for subsidized child care actually get it. That's one statistic in a new report that spells out ways to improve the growth and development of the state's youngest residents. The research is from the

According to a new investigative report, family courts systemically discredit claims of child abuse and award custody to the accused parent. (serggn/iStockphoto)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Over the past eight years, custodial parents killed 58 American children after a court ignored abuse claims by a protective parent, according to the Center for Judicial Excellence. And a new investigative report, published by 100Reporters.org, says family courts systemica

Many of California's immigrant farm workers, and their employers, hope the immigrants will be able to remain in the U.S. after the White House changes hands. (Igor Trepeshchenok/BarnImages)

LOS ANGELES – Some people in California are scrambling to get their identification and work documents in order by January. They are immigrants, concerned about President-elect Donald Trump's campaign promise to deport some 11 million undocumented people. Some experts think worker roundups a

California cut its number of uninsured children by 55 percent from 2013 to 2015. (Carolina Quezada/NACHC)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – California has made the biggest recent gains in the country in getting children signed up for health insurance, according to a new report. Researchers at the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families found the Golden State cut its number of uninsured children

Starting today, 35 California counties expand their health programs to include more low-income families, regardless of immigration status. (Cathy Yeulet/iStockphoto)

MARTINEZ, Calif. - Dozens of California counties are expanding health care for lower-income residents as of today, no matter their immigration status. Most of the counties are in Northern California, in the Central Valley and Sierra Nevadas. It's part of the County Medical Services Program, which

The CARE Act ensures hospitals give instructions to a caregiver and the patient upon discharge. (AARP)
Available In Spanish

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Nearly five months after it went into effect, health advocates say the CARE act is making a big difference in the amount of education patients and their caregivers receive. The Hospitals and Family Caregiver Act requires hospitals to designate a caregiver for each patient when

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