Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 23, 2018 


As the NRA doubles down on "good guys with guns," the Broward County Sheriff admits an armed deputy did not engage with the Parkland school shooter. Also on our nationwide rundown: workers across the nation will spend part of their weekend defending the American Dream; and a study says the Lone Star State is distorting Texas history lessons.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Welfare Reform

One in four American mothers in states without paid family medical-leave policies returns to work two weeks after giving birth for economic reasons. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Colorado workers, small-business owners and some lawmakers plan to gather on the west steps of the State Capitol today in support of the Colorado FAMLI Act, a bill that would create a worker-financed paid family leave program. Neha Mahajan, state director of the group 9to5 Colorado,

Children, seniors and people with disabilities receive almost 70 percent of SNAP benefits. (Getty Images)

DENVER – The Trump administration's tax proposals would not benefit all taxpayers or states equally, according to new analysis from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Matt Gardner, a senior fellow with the institute, says the richest 1 percent of taxpayers would receive more than

Medicaid expansion prevented Dale Terasaki from being saddled with more than $100,000 in debt after a medical emergency. (Barry Gutierrez)

DENVER -- Efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act are on hold for now, but medical professionals are concerned about what the U.S. Senate will bring forward after the July 4 recess. Dale Terasaki, a second year resident at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, has experience with Medicaid

Proposed cuts to Medicaid could impact nearly 130,000 seniors and people with disabilities in Colorado who rely on the program. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- As the GOP-led Congress struggles to make good on promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, leaders of Colorado's community health centers say new bills introduced this week could be devastating - especially for centers in rural parts of the state already operating on slim ma

Colorado's report card for delivering food stamps to struggling families is in, and there's good news but room for improvements. (Pixabay)

DENVER – More Colorado families who qualify for food stamps, the program known federally as SNAP, are getting assistance. That's according to new data compiled by Hunger Free Colorado. But, the state still ranks 45th nationally, and some 350,000 Coloradans are not getting help. Kathy Under

Advocacy groups are pushing political candidates to focus on child poverty. (Milkos/iStockphoto)

DENVER – Presidential candidates from both major parties have talked a lot about helping the middle class, but have skipped over one of the largest segments of the poor: babies, toddlers and preschoolers. Sarah Hughes, research director at the Colorado Children's Campaign, says poverty impac

SNAP benefits will be matched dollar for dollar when purchasing Colorado-grown fruits and vegetables at more than 30 farmers markets and other outlets. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Food stamps are now worth double for fresh fruits and vegetables at more than 30 farmers markets and other outlets in Colorado. Double Up Food Bucks Colorado allows SNAP recipients to use their EBT cards and get up to $20 worth of extra fresh produce per visit at participating locat

Raising SNAP or food-stamp benefits would lead to healthier diets for low-income families, according to a new report. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- Giving low-income families a little more money to spend on food would lead to healthier meals and free up funds for other necessities such as housing and transportation, according to new research. Increasing SNAP or food-stamp benefits by $30 per person per month also would help families

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