Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Children's Issues

AFSC Colorado is organizing an open forum in Denver on Jan. 27 in an effort to build support for immigration policies that would prevent families from being separated through deportation. (Alex Wong/GettyImages)

DENVER – Immigrants' rights supporters say they'll turn to Congress after the Trump administration removed Temporary Protected Status for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans who have lived in the U.S. since 2001. El Salvador joins a list of 13 countries the administration has targeted for TPS suspens

Women who have children as teens are less likely to graduate from high school, or earn as much as women who have children later in life. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's teen pregnancy and abortion rates continue to drop thanks to a state family planning program. According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the initiative saved taxpayers almost $70 million between 2009 and 2015. Karen Middleton, executive direc

The price of Christmas trees is expected to increase by as much as 10 percent this year. (Pixabay)

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – For many people, Christmas is just not complete without a decorated tree inside a warm home. David Fein, who describes himself as the "lead Elf" for the all-volunteer Christmas Tree Project, has made it his mission to get free trees to families struggling financiall

Children with health coverage are more likely to finish high school and college, and have higher earnings when they enter the workforce. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's financial reserves have kept the Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, running since Congress allowed funding to expire at the end of September. But Erin Miller, vice president of health initiatives with the Colorado Children's Campaign, says those reserves are al

Families who rely on school meal programs lean on food pantries when kids are out of school for the holidays. (Getty Images)

DENVER – When school lets out for the winter holidays, children get a break from homework, but for families struggling to pay bills and put food on the table, it's no vacation. Ellie Agar, communications manager with Hunger Free Colorado, says nearly 1 in 6 Colorado children may not know whe

Colorado could lose nearly $3 billion in gross domestic product and $768 million in lost tax revenues over the next decade if DACA ends, according to research by the Cato Institute. (Getty Images)

DENVER – Some 15,000 undocumented immigrants and supporters, including more than 20 from Colorado, are in Washington Wednesday to urge Congress to pass the Dream Act. Pamela Resendiz Trujano, deputy director of the group United for a New Economy, says immigration agents are picking up young

Many seasonal jobs at Colorado ski resorts don't provide health coverage, and premiums can top $1,000 a month for high-deductible plans. (Getty Images)

DENVER -- In 2011, 16 percent of Colorado residents did not have health insurance, but by 2015 - after the rollout of the Affordable Care Act - that rate had dropped to just over 6 percent and is holding steady. That's according to the 2017 Colorado Health Access Survey. Michele Lueck, executive d

Coal-fired power plants are the nation's top source of CO2 emissions. Burning coal also is a leading cause of smog, acid rain and toxic air pollution. (Getty Images)

DENVER - The Trump administration on Tuesday took steps to repeal the Clean Power Plan, the nation's first-ever attempt to limit carbon pollution from existing power plants. Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt has claimed the move will correct what he sees as an executive overreach o

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