Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 19, 2018 


It will be up to the U.S. Senate today to take the next step, if a government shutdown is to be averted; also in focus on our Friday rundown, President Trump extends Religious-Refusal Protections to health providers; and, we will tell you about a 15 year old in North Carolina who just formed a Political Action Committee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ID: Environment

Boise is partnering with a Salt Lake City company to turn some hard-to-recycle plastics into diesel. (Sustainable Initiatives Fund Trust/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – Boise has found a new destination for some plastics after China announced it will no longer accept certain recyclables. China has been a major market for western U.S. cities' recycling material, and its announcement has put many in a tough spot. Starting this spring, Boise is

Conservation groups say the lower Snake River dams need to come down if salmon populations in the Northwest are to recover. (Wilson Hui/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – Salmon and steelhead in the Northwest faced another alarming year in 2017, with return numbers declining yet again. Joseph Bogaard, executive director of the Save Our Wild Salmon coalition, said poor ocean conditions hurt the fish this year, although he added those conditions

The number of Idahoans using solar power has doubled over the last two years. (IndianCkDish4/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – 2017 could be remembered as the year solar energy caught on in Idaho. If it does, it would be thanks in part to the Snake River Alliance, which launched Solarize the Valley 18 months ago. The program provides a low-cost solar panel installation and has helped 109 homes get pow

In 2015, the EPA identified more than 220 mines that would have been affected by a rule requiring companies to pay for the cleanup. (Pete Markham/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – The Environmental Protection Agency has announced it's scrapping rules drafted during the Obama administration that require hard-rock mining companies to clean up their own messes. The rule made sure companies that mine for gold, copper and other non-coal minerals had enough mon

Cross-laminated timber, used in some buildings in place of steel, is seeing a growing market demand in the Northwest. (Denna Jones/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – Businesses, environmental groups and the timber industry are just a few of the diverse groups coming together for Idaho's first-ever statewide summit on climate change. "Safeguarding Idaho's Economy in a Changing Climate" is a two-day event that started Thursday. The goal is t

Conservation groups are concerned that a bill in Congress will undermine environmental laws. (Larry Miller/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – Passed by the U.S. House and moving on to the Senate, the Resilient Federal Forests Act is aimed at protecting forests from fires. But conservation groups in Idaho and across the country say it undermines the most meaningful efforts to do just that. Among their many concerns i

This year's wildfire season is the most expensive on record. Last year, the Pioneer Fire burned nearly 190,000 acres of the Boise National Forest. (U.S. Forest Service/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – A rare moment of bipartisanship is catching on among Western states' members of Congress with a bill to treat wildfires more like other natural disasters. The Wildfire Disaster Funding Act has the support of congressional delegations from Idaho and other Northwest states. It

Beavers were nearly wiped out in the Northwest a century ago. (Yellowstone National Park/Flickr)

BOISE, Idaho – For Idaho and other parts of the West to fight drought and arid conditions, taking a cue from beavers might help. Thought to be a nuisance by some landowners, researchers are finding the dams that beavers build on creeks and rivers actually help restore them. Researchers des

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