PNS Daily Newscast - March 20, 2018 

President Trump again calls for the death penalty for drug dealers and Granite State advocates say they oppose the get tough approach. Also on today’s rundown: a protest against the expansion of tar-sands oil refining in California; and in Seattle, a group demands a moratorium on youth jail construction.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Children's Issues

About 70 percent of parents and caregivers admit they've stored medications where children can see them. (

INDIANAPOLIS — Every nine minutes in this country, a child under the age of six has to go to the emergency room because of accidental medication poisoning - and every twelve days, the incident is fatal. The Indiana Poison Center receives about 60,000 calls for help a year. March 18-24 is Poi

Many babies die in Indiana because they're born pre-term or because of unsafe sleeping practices. (Carrie Cain)

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana's infant mortality rate is dismal, and advocates hope a new law signed by the governor will be a step towards lowering those numbers. Legislation guaranteeing consistent levels of care for all Hoosier mothers and infants goes into effect July 1. SB 360 creates a system

Kids may react negatively to extreme stress because of other things that are bothering them, or because they don't know how to express how they feel. (

INDIANAPOLIS – As the nation still reels from the latest school massacre, young people are making their voices heard – in both good and bad ways. Many students are speaking out about the availability of guns and what they want lawmakers to do about it. Nancy Lindhjem, a school psycho

One in 10 Hoosier kids reportedly lives with someone who's dealing with substance abuse. (

INDIANAPOLIS – The latest KIDS COUNT Data Book for Indiana is out, and it shows the state has made some strides, but the Indiana Youth Institute says there's still a big problem that needs to be addressed. The group's president, Tami Silverman, says the impact the opioid epidemic is having o

The federal budget plan would reduce money to the main food-assistance program in the country. (

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – Many of us ate too much, spent more than we should have and ended up with gifts we don't even need this holiday season. But there are also many Hoosiers who struggle every day, including through the holidays. Food bank workers say, while donations go up at this time of the

Hoosier schools are becoming more educationally and culturally diverse. (Juan Esteban Zapata)

INDIANAPOLIS – As schools in Indiana become more educationally and culturally diverse, educators say there's a growing need to reach out to parents who may not be familiar with the American education system, or the English language. The Indiana Youth Institute sponsored workshops this past w

Of the 1.5 million children living in the Hoosier State, thousands are in need of foster or adoptive homes. (

INDIANAPOLIS — As the number of children in foster care in Indiana continues to increase, the 2017 Because Kids Count conference in downtown Indianapolis will bring experts together next week to discuss the problem. One of the event’s keynote speakers is intimately connected to the iss

More than 300,000 Indiana children live in households considered food insecure. (V. Carter)

INDIANAPOLIS – While the number of people applying for federal nutrition assistance has dropped slightly in Indiana, more than 14 percent of Hoosiers are still living in poverty, according to the latest report from the U.S. Census Bureau. More than 950,000 are food insecure – meaning

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