PNS Daily Newscast - March 21, 2018 

Public News Service UPDATE: the Austin bomber blows himself up; also on the rundown a school resource officer credited with saving lives; the North Carolina GOP Silent on an apparent Cambridge Analytica connection; and an Alabama Medicaid Work requirement plan called a Catch-22.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MD: Environment

Chesapeake Conservation Corps members collect water samples as part of their work with organizations and communities in the Chesapeake Bay region. (

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – A Maryland program to help young adults prepare for "green careers" like environmental protection or green construction is seeking candidates. People between the ages of 18 to 25 can jump-start their careers and protect the environment in the Chesapeake Conservation Corps, cre

Between 2012 and 2016, Chesapeake Bay Program partners opened 1,126 historical fish migration routes for fish passage, exceeding the outcome to restore 1,000 additional stream miles. (Pixabay)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Ongoing efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay have reached a turning point and environmental groups are calling on residents to keep the momentum going. The annual Bay Barometer, a science-based snapshot of the health of the Chesapeake shows significant improvements in unde

Chesapeake Bay Trust encourages the public to purchase Chesapeake Bay plates to help restore the bay and other natural resources in the region. (BelindaMariepix/Flickr)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. --The ongoing multi-million dollar effort to clean up Chesapeake Bay finally is starting to pay off. State scientists found fewer water samples showing the presence of so-called dead zones that can't support aquatic life. While bay advocates praise the success of the coordinated cle

The National Coalition For Responsible Technology is calling for a moratorium on cell towers and cell antennas near homes, hospitals, schools and children's recreation areas. Ellen Marks, director of the California Brain Tumor Association, speaking.   (Theodora Scarato/NCRT)

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — As wireless communication increasingly becomes a way of life, some health advocates say there is little-to-no communication about the health risks associated with radiation emitted by devices such as cellphones. Theodora Scarato, executive director at the Environmental Healt

Research has shown the same pesticides that are wiping out bees are impacting hummingbirds as well. (

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – As we enjoy the late-summer crops produced in this country and around the world, advocates are hoping everyone will take time to appreciate the little creatures that pollinated them. About three-quarters of the more than 240,000 species of the world's flowering plants rely o

Young volunteers are selected to work with nonprofits around Maryland for a year. (

BALTIMORE -- The latest class of the Chesapeake Conservation Corps is ready to go to work cleaning up and preserving Maryland's natural treasures. The Corps is a program created several years ago by the Maryland Legislature to provide job training for young people and promote the green economy at

A congressional panel tasked with coming up with climate change solutions is growing in membership. (

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – A panel made up of members of Congress who are seeking solutions to climate change is growing by leaps and bounds. The Climate Solutions Caucus started with just a handful of members a few years ago, but now has 50. It's bipartisan, and for every Democratic member added, t

On Aug. 21, Marylanders will get to see an almost full eclipse of the sun. (

BALTIMORE – One week from Monday, the moon's shadow will block the sun from view in a total solar eclipse. The moon will cast a 70-mile-wide shadow by slipping between Earth and the sun. It's causing a lot of excitement because it's the first one in 99 years. While there is no risk to he

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