Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 11, 2017 


Families across the nation are still waiting for children's health insurance funding; also on our nationwide rundown, Aztec High School in New Mexico remains closed following a deadly shooting; plus a look at how politics figure into most companies' marketing strategies.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Civic Engagement

Cosmopolitan Park in Columbia was the location of choice for 10,000 people viewing Monday's solar eclipse. (Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau)

COLUMBIA, Mo. - The city of Columbia is busy with post-eclipse calculations - not the astronomy, but the economic impact of this week's festivities on the area. Events linked to Monday's solar eclipse filled every hotel room in town on Sunday night and up to 70 percent of the lodging on Monday nigh

Marcellus Williams' 2014 mug shot, taken 15 years after his conviction for the death of Felicia Gayle. (Missouri Department of Corrections)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Marcellus Williams was only a few hours from being executed Tuesday when Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens stepped in to issue a stay, citing new DNA evidence in Williams' capital murder case. Williams was convicted in the 1998 stabbing death of former St. Louis Post-Dispatch repor

Anthropologist Karen Stephenson says soft power or trust yields innovation in metropolitan areas such as Kansas City. (Jay Castor/Pixabay)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – When you want to make substantive changes to your community and do meaningful work, it's natural to first seek out the most powerful people in town. But just concluded research from an anthropologist and data scientist suggests something different. Karen Stephenson spent

The co-author of

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – For many minorities, the recent events in Charlottesville, Va., and the response to them come as no surprise. Other Americans have interpreted the events as isolated and rare. A Midwest researcher is working to resolve the disconnect and provide tools to reduce inequality.

Social scientists say that cursing can be traced back centuries and offers an immediate form of expression, albeit with potential consequences. (Ashish Choudhary/Pixabay)

COLUMBIA, Mo. – An explicit tirade from new White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci is the latest evidence of what protocol experts say has become increasingly common – cursing as a form of public communication. Many people, including a fired University of Missouri profe

J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain was dedicated in 1960 and underwent a major renovation in 2014 with monies from the Miller Nichols Charitable Foundation. (Kansas City Parks & Recreation Dept.)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Should Kansas City's iconic J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain be renamed? That's the central question being debated by residents and city officials in the wake of a Kansas City Star opinion column. Nichols, who died in 1950, was a nationally recognized civic leader and real estate

The State Capitol is home away from home for Missouri lawmakers this summer as they begin their second special session in as many months. (Wikipedia)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Special sessions of the Missouri Legislature are typically reserved for emergency budget matters, but that isn't the case this year. State lawmakers are back in session today to address abortion-related issues, including a St. Louis ordinance banning discrimination in housin

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and his Republican colleagues have political calculations to make in the wake of former FBI Director Jim Comey's testimony. (USDA/Flickr)

ST. LOUIS – Missouri, like the rest of the nation, is still digesting yesterday's congressional testimony of former FBI Director Jim Comey, who believes he was fired by President Donald Trump because of the Russia investigation. Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee the President mali

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