Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 17, 2018 


As the DOJ tries a rare direct appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court on DACA, a new report says border patrol agents have been vandalizing water left for migrants; also, on today's rundown a labor dispute in Minnesota could affect Super Bowl week; and the Interior decision nears on sage-grouse plans.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Public Lands/Wilderness

Drilling off the coast of North Carolina is predicted to harm wildlife and discourage the tourism and fishing industry. (Michael Herzog/flickr)

BEAUFORT, N.C. – On Thursday, the Trump administration announced plans to open up Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf and Arctic waters to offshore drilling. If the Department of the Interior moves forward, it will be the biggest oil and gas lease sale ever. The news is initiating ripples of concern fro

Employees from North Carolina businesses participate in projects for nonprofits on Earth Day with the coordination of Earthshare NC. (Earthshare NC)

RALEIGH, N.C. – It's hard to 'think green' in the mix of all the red and green this holiday, but that's exactly what dozens of North Carolina companies already are doing. Earth Day is four months away, and businesses are planning their community service projects with the help of an innovativ

Resource Institute is one nonprofit managing to push forward with conservation work under the Trump administration. The organization emphasizes job creation as a means to garner support. (Resource Institute)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – With funding cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency and auctions of public lands, the situation seems dire for some of those invested in protecting the country's natural resources. But some organizations are finding ways to work in the current political climate. Reso

Downtown businesses are flourishing in Mount Airy, thanks to the development of a greenway, because of increased residents, tourists and events. (Allen Forrest/flickr)

MOUNT AIRY, N.C. – As development expands in even the smallest of North Carolina towns, erosion is a growing problem for existing waterways. That was the case for Mount Airy before city planners partnered with water conservation experts to find a solution that's paying back in big dividends.

The Rock Creek tract of land is among the acreage protected by the Foothills Conservancy of North Carolina. (Foothills Conservancy of North Carolina)

MORGANTON, N.C. – Thursday marks the Super Bowl of eating for many, and a brisk walk before or after eating too much turkey and gravy could go a long way in reducing our discomfort later in the day. In North Carolina, trails and activities can be found on land conserved by the state's 22 lan

Banks on the stream in Stone Mountain State Park were excavated and cleared after a rock quarry damaged the health of the waterway. (Greg Jennings)

ROARING GAP, N.C. -- North Carolina is changing the way it manages its state lands and waterways. After decades of a hands-off approach, a new method is being used in hundreds of projects across the state. Called active management, the practice describes a process where problems in stream health a

Dogwood Alliance and Sierra Club produced an informational video on the damage forest harvesting is doing to parts of eastern North Carolina. (Hendy Street Produxions)

CLINTON, N.C. -- North Carolina's hardwood forests - located in the eastern part of the state - are becoming a high demand commodity for a growing energy industry. Parts of Europe are transitioning to the use of wood pellets for power generation and the heating of their homes and businesses. It's

The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy maintains Laurel Ridge Preserve, which adjoins Asheville Watershed land. (SAHC)

BLACK MOUNTAIN, N.C. – In many parts of North Carolina, riverfronts are becoming prime real estate, with cities such as Asheville now developing their waterways for public and private use. While development is largely good for the economy, many of the state's land conservancies are working to

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