Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Water

GenX is one chemical used in the past to manufacture the nonstick surface of Teflon. It is found in numerous products, including nonstick pans. (Thomas/flickr)

WILMINGTON, N.C. – The wheels of government are turning slowly for residents who count on the Cape Fear watershed for their drinking supply. This week, the General Assembly was unable to pass legislation that would have funded additional testing for GenX in the water supply. The chemical ha

Drilling off the coast of North Carolina is predicted to harm wildlife and discourage the tourism and fishing industry. (Michael Herzog/flickr)

BEAUFORT, N.C. – On Thursday, the Trump administration announced plans to open up Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf and Arctic waters to offshore drilling. If the Department of the Interior moves forward, it will be the biggest oil and gas lease sale ever. The news is initiating ripples of concern fro

Resource Institute is one nonprofit managing to push forward with conservation work under the Trump administration. The organization emphasizes job creation as a means to garner support. (Resource Institute)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – With funding cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency and auctions of public lands, the situation seems dire for some of those invested in protecting the country's natural resources. But some organizations are finding ways to work in the current political climate. Reso

The state is asking additional questions about a proposed natural gas pipeline that Duke Energy and Dominion Energy want to run through Virginia and North Carolina. (keifer.miller/flickr)

Correction: Resending to correct reach of pipeline. RALEIGH, N.C. -- A pipeline that would carry natural gas across North Carolina and Virginia faces another delay in the Tar Heel State, as Department of Environmental Quality officials ask another round of questions about the risks and benefits of

Downtown businesses are flourishing in Mount Airy, thanks to the development of a greenway, because of increased residents, tourists and events. (Allen Forrest/flickr)

MOUNT AIRY, N.C. – As development expands in even the smallest of North Carolina towns, erosion is a growing problem for existing waterways. That was the case for Mount Airy before city planners partnered with water conservation experts to find a solution that's paying back in big dividends.

The Rock Creek tract of land is among the acreage protected by the Foothills Conservancy of North Carolina. (Foothills Conservancy of North Carolina)

MORGANTON, N.C. – Thursday marks the Super Bowl of eating for many, and a brisk walk before or after eating too much turkey and gravy could go a long way in reducing our discomfort later in the day. In North Carolina, trails and activities can be found on land conserved by the state's 22 lan

Banks on the stream in Stone Mountain State Park were excavated and cleared after a rock quarry damaged the health of the waterway. (Greg Jennings)

ROARING GAP, N.C. -- North Carolina is changing the way it manages its state lands and waterways. After decades of a hands-off approach, a new method is being used in hundreds of projects across the state. Called active management, the practice describes a process where problems in stream health a

The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy maintains Laurel Ridge Preserve, which adjoins Asheville Watershed land. (SAHC)

BLACK MOUNTAIN, N.C. – In many parts of North Carolina, riverfronts are becoming prime real estate, with cities such as Asheville now developing their waterways for public and private use. While development is largely good for the economy, many of the state's land conservancies are working to

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