PNS Daily Newscast - March 23, 2018 

McMaster out and Bolton in. Also on the Friday rundown: Students across the nation prepare for the March For Our Lives; some good news on the labor front; and folks in Montana take clean power into their own hands.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - OR: Water

An Oregon fishing guide says fishers worry about the effects of ethanol on their outboard motors. (Michelle B./Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – A bill to reform the biofuels mandate could reverse a decade of destruction to America's grasslands, according to environmental groups. The GREENER Fuels Act would gradually reduce the amount of biofuels such as corn ethanol in the nation's fuel supply. It also would stop

Nearly 64 percent of bottled water comes from municipal taps, according to a new report. (Steven Depolo/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Sales are skyrocketing for the bottled water industry, but what are companies actually selling to customers? In its new report "Take Back the Tap," Food and Water Watch researchers look at the booming business of bottled water, which surpassed soda in sales in 2016. The grou

Bonneville Dam is one of many in the Columbia River basin. (Colleen Benelli/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Columbia River Treaty negotiations between the United States and Canada are set to begin in 2018, and advocates for the environment say the river's health should be the focus of talks. Conversation, fishing and faith-based groups, as well as tribes in the Columbia River basi

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument was created in 2000 and expanded in 2017. (Bureau of Land Management/Flickr)

ASHLAND, Ore. – Chambers of Commerce and businesses in Oregon and across the country are telling the director of the National Economic Council that national monuments are integral to local economies. A leaked memo from the Interior Department suggests reducing the size of the Cascade-Siskiyo

The Siletz River Ecosystem in Lincoln County provides some of the drinking water for the county's residents. (osunikon/Flickr)

NEWPORT, Ore. – Can a river defend itself in court? On Monday, a judge in Newport will answer that question in the case of the Siletz River Ecosystem. Last May, Lincoln County residents approved a measure banning aerial pesticide spraying – a measure that stated the river had the "ri

Pesticides are usually sprayed from aircraft in the clear-cutting of forests near the Siletz River. (Rio Davidson/Lincoln County Community Rights)

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Siletz River ecosystem could take some novel legal action in an Oregon case over a measure banning aerial pesticides. In May, Lincoln County residents passed a measure outlawing the spraying of pesticides from aircraft. The measure is the first of its kind in the nation.

A new report finds cleaning the Columbia River up for fish would have significant economic value for the region. (Thomas/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- A cleaner Columbia River could unlock even more economic potential for the Northwest, according to a new report. In Earth Economics' analysis of the Columbia River Basin, its natural value totals nearly $200 billion dollars annually in food, water, recreation, flood risk reductio

The Nature Conservancy is teaming up with a local land trust to protect part of Tillamook Head, a region identified as resilient as climate change worsens. (OCVA/Flickr)

SEASIDE, Ore. – As climate change worsens, certain landscapes could become refuges from the most dramatic effects to nature. One conservation group is looking to harness the power of those refuges by protecting lands that will be most resilient as global temperatures rise. The Nature Conserv

1 of 11 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »