Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 17, 2018 


As the DOJ tries a rare direct appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court on DACA, a new report says border patrol agents have been vandalizing water left for migrants; also, on today's rundown a labor dispute in Minnesota could affect Super Bowl week; and the Interior decision nears on sage-grouse plans.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - PA: Civil Rights

Police stop-and-frisk practices also have been challenged in New York City. (Michael Fleshman/Flickr)

PHILADELPHIA – The number of police stop-and-frisk encounters with Philadelphia pedestrians is declining, but the latest data shows racial disparities persist. Numbers from the first six months of last year show that since 2010 there's been a 50 percent drop in stops overall. But 69 percent

Education Savings Accounts would give public education money to families to pay private school tuition. (Jason Pope/Flickr)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Education advocates say bills pending in the General Assembly to create Education Savings Accounts would further defund public education in the state. Senate Bill 2 and House Bill 1717 would allow parents to pay private school tuition with public money. The stated goal is

Polls show that more than half of Pennsylvanians support access to abortion services. (Fibonacci Blue/Flickr)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Without a hearing, the House Health Committee voted Monday to send a restrictive anti-abortion bill to the floor for a vote. Senate Bill 3, which already has passed in the state Senate, would ban all abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, and makes no exception for rape, in

Cellphones have become important tools for documenting and deterring police misconduct. (StockSnap/Pixabay)

PHILADELPHIA – Philadelphia will pay $250,000 to settle two lawsuits brought by people who were restrained or arrested for recording police. The cases were part of a series of five filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of people who faced retaliation for photographing or reco

Nationally more than 1 million African-Americans live within half a mile of existing natural gas facilities. (dbchandler/Pixabay)

PHILADELPHIA – A new report shows that pollution from oil and gas facilities in Pennsylvania and nationwide is disproportionately harming African-American communities. The report, "Fumes Across the Fence-Line," documents health impacts of living near oil and gas pollution, including increase

If successful, the lawsuit could change voting district lines before the 2018 election. (Tom Prete/Flickr)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – A ruling by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court could result in a new election district map in the Keystone State. Experts say Pennsylvania has one of the most gerrymandered congressional and legislative district maps in the country. Although voters are pretty evenly divided bet

In 2015 Williams was raped multiple times by an inmate in Allegheny County Jail. (TheZachMorrisExperience/Wikimedia Commons)

PITTSBURGH – Allegheny County is being sued by a transgender woman who was sexually and verbally abused while in the county jail. Jules Williams has lived as a woman for years and her gender identity is affirmed by her state-issued identification and birth certificate. But according to Sar

Schools can't discipline students for posting to social media from off campus on their own time. (StockSnap/Pixabay)

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. – Schools can't punish students for swearing when they're off campus - that's the message of a federal court to a Pennsylvania high school. The student, who is a minor, is only referred to by her initials, B.L. She was dropped from her school's junior varsity cheerleading s

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