Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to Congress. Also on our rundown: More evidence that rent prices are out of reach in many markets; Wisconsin counties brace for sulfide mining; and the Earth Day focus this weekend in North Dakota is on recycling.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Environment

Poorly designed culverts can make it nearly impossible for salmon to swim upstream to spawn. (Jerilyn Walley/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The U.S. Supreme Court hears a case today with major implications for the rights of tribes and salmon in Washington state. At the center of Washington v. United States are culverts, the pipes that carry streams under roads. The state has more than 800 culverts blocking more than 1,000 mil

More than 25,000 people showed up to support the Seattle March for Science last year. (Dennis Bratland/Wikimedia Commons)

SEATTLE – Marchers are turning out again to support science. On Saturday, people around the world will take to the streets for the second "March for Science." The event highlights the importance of evidence-based policymaking and in Seattle, will feature speeches from House Majority Leader N

A federal court has mandated that dams in the Columbia River Basin increase spill for salmon four times since 2005. (U.S. Forest Service/Flickr)

SEATTLE – A U.S. appeals court on Monday upheld a decision to allow Northwest dams to release more water over their spillways to help young salmon heading toward the ocean. Dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers will begin spilling more water in the next week. Federal agencies appealed a deci

The Olympic Peninsula is recognized as a World Heritage Site because of its old-growth forests. (The Nature Conservancy)

FORKS, Wash. – The Washington Legislature has set aside $1 million in the capital budget for management of land and rivers on the Olympic Peninsula, home to forests recognized the world over. It also will become the site of an experiment in restoration. The Nature Conservancy is using lessons

Groups like Chaplain on the Harbor will be in Renton on Saturday recruiting for this year's Poor People's Campaign. (Poor People's Campaign)

RENTON, Wash. – In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. launched the Poor People's Campaign. A half-century later, the campaign is still going – and this week, its organizers held events at state capitols calling for a "moral revival" across the country. On Saturday, groups including Chap

Worsening wildfires are a concern if Washington state lawmakers don't find ways to give businesses more incentive to reduce carbon emissions. (LDELD/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington state Senate is considering a bill outlined by Gov. Jay Inslee that would make polluters pay – and use the money to invest in clean jobs and keeping natural resources resilient. Senate Bill 6203 would tax carbon polluters, with the funds used to speed up

Gov. Jay Inslee has rejected an oil terminal that would have sent 360,000 barrels of oil a day through the Columbia River Gorge. (Kat Holmes/Washington Environmental Council)

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Gov. Jay Inslee has delivered the final blow in the long battle over a proposed oil terminal in Vancouver. On Monday, Inslee agreed with the recommendation of the Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC), which voted unanimously at the end of last year to reject the

WSU researchers have developed a micro-particle they say can be fed to bees to help them withstand exposure to pesticides. (Photo courtesy of Brandon Hopkins and Waled Suliman.)

PULLMAN, Wash. – Two Washington State University researchers have been recognized for their development of a food supplement that helps bee colonies survive the toxic effects of pesticides. Brandon Hopkins and Waled Suliman developed a carbon micro-particle beekeepers can add to meals that r

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