Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Livable Wages/Working Families

On Wednesday, a Washington State Senate committee held a public hearing in Olympia on two bills that address the gender pay gap in the state. (SounderBruce/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- At its current rate, the pay gap for women in Washington state compared to men won't close until 2070. As the new legislative session begins, hopes are high that 2018 is the year lawmakers update the state's equal-pay laws and close that gap much sooner. On Wednesday, the Senate

Recidivism rates are higher for people who aren't able to find a job after they're released from prison. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – A bill that would help formerly incarcerated Washingtonians get a fairer chance at employment is scheduled for a public hearing Wednesday. The Fair Chance Act would "ban the box" – that is, prevent employers from asking about a person's criminal background until after

About 52,000 children in Washington state get some funding for health coverage through CHIP, which is known as Apple Health for Kids. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – A last-minute deal in Congress to provide short-term funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program hasn't done much to alleviate stress for states and parents going into the new year. CHIP is one of the main funding streams, along with Medicaid and state funding, for Washingt

Graduate students who work at the University of Washington could see their taxes go up by $5,000, according to a student employees' union. (Intel Free Press/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Cash-strapped graduate students in Washington state and across the country are watching the tax debate in Congress closely. A provision in the House GOP's bill to overhaul the tax code, which passed last week, would turn tuition waivers offered by universities into taxable income.

More than 11 million kids nationwide are alone or unsupervised after class ends, according to the Afterschool Alliance. (School's Out Washington)

VANCOUVER, Wash. -- Today communities in Washington and across the nation celebrate Lights On Afterschool Day. Now in its 17th year, the day highlights programs that keep kids safe and engaged beyond school hours. According to the Afterschool Alliance, more than 11 million children nationwide are

Multiple organizations, including AFT Washington, are protesting U.S. Education Secretary Betsy Devos's visit to Bellevue today. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

BELLEVUE, Wash. – Protestors plan to greet Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in Bellevue today, where she is scheduled to speak at an annual fundraiser for the Washington Policy Center, a free-market think tank. The center says it invited DeVos to speak because she's one of the nation's top po

Antitrust laws may not be effective at busting up modern day technology companies. (David Ryder/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – Nowhere is the trend toward market consolidation, or monopolization, more apparent than in the technology industry. In August, Seattle-based Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market, raising questions about whether the company is becoming a monopoly. Washington state also is home to an

The U.S. Supreme Court heard a case Monday that could affect whether nearly 25 million workers have the right to file class-action lawsuits against their employers. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – Workers in Washington state and across the country watched the U.S. Supreme Court closely Monday as justices heard oral arguments in a case to determine whether employers can ban class-action lawsuits. The case, Epic Systems Corporation versus Lewis, involves arbitration agreements

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