Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Children's Issues

Frequent and thorough hand washing is critical to prevent the spread of viruses like the flu. (gentle07/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – How sick is sick enough to stay home from school or work? With so many obligations, the decision can be tough, but it's also vitally important during flu season. Already, 20 people have died from the flu in Washington state this season, according to health officials. Dr. Angie

About 52,000 children in Washington state get some funding for health coverage through CHIP, which is known as Apple Health for Kids. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – A last-minute deal in Congress to provide short-term funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program hasn't done much to alleviate stress for states and parents going into the new year. CHIP is one of the main funding streams, along with Medicaid and state funding, for Washingt

Without a capital budget, many programs aren't able to start the renovations needed to add preschools to the state. (Joe Wolf/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- The seemingly endless stalemate over the capital budget is frustrating school districts and attempts to expand the state's preschool program. More than $1 billion in the budget is for school construction, including in many rural districts in need of renovations such as the Rearda

More than 11 million kids nationwide are alone or unsupervised after class ends, according to the Afterschool Alliance. (School's Out Washington)

VANCOUVER, Wash. -- Today communities in Washington and across the nation celebrate Lights On Afterschool Day. Now in its 17th year, the day highlights programs that keep kids safe and engaged beyond school hours. According to the Afterschool Alliance, more than 11 million children nationwide are

After-school and summer programs are helping Washington children develop both career and coping skills, according to a report to the State Legislature. (Sparkwind Movement)

SEATTLE – Washington state is improving programs for children after school and in the summer, according to a report to the Legislature, which agreed to help fund the programs. When programs are properly funded and work right, they can improve children's academic, social and emotional abiliti

Health experts say kids should be involved in activities such as soccer to fight the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. (Edward N. Johnson/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The growing epidemic of childhood obesity in the United States has health experts worried about children's well-being. The percent of children who are considered overweight has more than tripled since the 1970s, and being overweight can lead to devastating health effects. Kaiser Pe

Washingtonians should reapply sunscreen every two hours to avoid sunburns and skin damage. (Marie/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Washingtonians finally looking to catch some rays need to be careful to avoid damage to their skin. Dr. Katie Osley, a dermatologist at Kaiser Permanente, says avoiding overexposure from the sun can mean wearing a layer of clothes – she advises something lightweight and cotto

Washington lost more than 16-hundred child-care providers over the past six years, according to a report. (Seattle Parks/Flickr)

DES MOINES, Wash. – With kids out of school for summer vacation, working parents face the higher seasonal costs of child care. In Washington state, care for a child younger than four can range from $8,000 to nearly $16,000 a year, which is about the same as in-state tuition for a public colleg

1 of 24 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »