Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 23, 2018 


As the NRA doubles down on "good guys with guns," the Broward County Sheriff admits an armed deputy did not engage with the Parkland school shooter. Also on our nationwide rundown: workers across the nation will spend part of their weekend defending the American Dream; and a study says the Lone Star State is distorting Texas history lessons.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Poverty Issues

Groups like Chaplain on the Harbor will be in Renton on Saturday recruiting for this year's Poor People's Campaign. (Poor People's Campaign)

RENTON, Wash. – In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. launched the Poor People's Campaign. A half-century later, the campaign is still going – and this week, its organizers held events at state capitols calling for a "moral revival" across the country. On Saturday, groups including Chap

Providers prescribe antibiotics too often, costing patients unnecessarily, according to a new report. (oliver.dodd/Flickr)

SEATTLE — In a single year, more than 600,000 Washingtonians underwent treatment they didn't need, according to a new analysis. In the Washington Health Alliance report First, Do No Harm: Calculating Health Care Waste in Washington State, researchers found people spent more than $280 million

The 1968 sanitation workers' strike in Memphis attracted the attention of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (iam2018.org)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Union members across the country are honoring two sanitation workers killed in Memphis 50 years ago today with a moment of silence. Leading up to the deaths of Echol Cole and Robert Walker, workers had complained about unsafe conditions, but were ignored. Their deaths led to

The Legislature is considering a bill that would expand eligibility for the state's pre-K program. (Washington State House Republicans/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The marchers may be little, but their cause is not. Toddlers and their parents are gathering in Olympia Wednesday to rally for their education. Childhood learning advocates want greater access and more investment in the state's pre-K program, known as the Early Childhood E

A new billionaire was created every two days last year, according to an Oxfam report. (Pictures of Money/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Last year, billionaires saw their wealth increase enough to end extreme poverty around the world seven times over, according to a report from the global charity organization Oxfam. The report, “Reward Work, Not Wealth," says 82 percent of the wealth created in 2017 went to th

Graduate students who work at the University of Washington could see their taxes go up by $5,000, according to a student employees' union. (Intel Free Press/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Cash-strapped graduate students in Washington state and across the country are watching the tax debate in Congress closely. A provision in the House GOP's bill to overhaul the tax code, which passed last week, would turn tuition waivers offered by universities into taxable income.

Voters in King County have until November 7 to vote on Proposition 1, which approves a levy to support services for seniors and veterans. (Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)

SEATTLE -- Advocates for senior services are rallying behind Proposition 1 in King County, which renews a levy that supports veterans and human services, and expands it to include older Washingtonians. The measure asks voters to approve a 10 cent property tax for every $1,000 of assessed property

Washington lost more than 16-hundred child-care providers over the past six years, according to a report. (Seattle Parks/Flickr)

DES MOINES, Wash. – With kids out of school for summer vacation, working parents face the higher seasonal costs of child care. In Washington state, care for a child younger than four can range from $8,000 to nearly $16,000 a year, which is about the same as in-state tuition for a public colleg

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