PNS Daily Newscast - March 20, 2018 

President Trump again calls for the death penalty for drug dealers and Granite State advocates say they oppose the get tough approach. Also on today’s rundown: a protest against the expansion of tar-sands oil refining in California; and in Seattle, a group demands a moratorium on youth jail construction.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Livable Wages/Working Families

West Virginia spends about 20 percent less on school workers as a proportion of the state's Gross Domestic Product than it did eight years ago. (W. Va. Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Striking teachers are angry about rising health care premiums and eroding benefits from West Virginia's Public Employee Insurance Agency. But what would a real PEIA fix look like? School workers, who are away from their classrooms for an eighth day today, say they want mo

According to the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, a proposed business tax cut would have cost the same as an 11-percent raise for teachers and school service workers. (Sean O'Leary/WV COBP)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson County, says the state can only afford a 4-percent pay raise for teachers. But is that true? Critics point out that Carmichael started the legislative session backing a plan to cut taxes on business machinery, eq

Thousands of teachers and school employees faced a cold rain to rally for better pay and insurance outside the West Virginia Capitol on Saturday. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia teachers say they'll strike Thursday and Friday over pay and health insurance, and bills likely to pass the legislature look unlikely to prevent a longer walkout. The House and Senate have debated raising teacher pay by 1 percent a year. But according to the

Food pantries reported a rise in requests for help in the nine West Virginia counties where work requirements were added to the SNAP program. (WV Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia lawmakers who want to add work requirements to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program argue that many of the people now getting SNAP are shirking employment, but evidence suggests that's not true. Angie Williams is a single mother of four with a full-t

The parents of children who get care through CHIP are watching Congress anxiously. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Without renewed funding from Congress, the West Virginia Children's Health Insurance Program is running on fumes - which is worrying families. At the end of next month, the program will stop new enrollment, a first step in winding down. That's scary for the parents of th

The economic growth that is reducing poverty nationally is largely bypassing West Virginia. (The Coalition on Human Needs)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Economic growth is finally reducing poverty in most of the country - but not in West Virginia, according to a new report. The research, released jointly by the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy and the Coalition on Human Needs, found the U.S. poverty rate has fallen by

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice says the state now can move ahead on a huge number of road projects. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Some West Virginians who voted for the road bonds say they did so just to get the roads fixed. Now that voters have approved it, Gov. Jim Justice's proposal will allow the state to sell more than $1.5 billion in bonds to fund road construction and repair. In the run-up to the

Grassroots groups in West Virginia organized to put public pressure on Sen. Shelley Moore Capito ahead of last week's health care votes. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Grassroots public pressure in states like West Virginia had a role in defending the Affordable Care Act. Leading into last week's dramatic final votes, organizations and ordinary citizens across the state put on dozens - maybe hundreds - of events. Selina Vickers of Fayette Co

1 of 41 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »