PNS Daily Newscast - March 23, 2018 

McMaster out and Bolton in. Also on the Friday rundown: Students across the nation prepare for the March For Our Lives; some good news on the labor front; and folks in Montana take clean power into their own hands.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Toxics

Natural gas wells are known to be sources of problematic air pollution, and may be causing issues in developing fetuses. (Egan Jimenez/The Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — Babies born to women who lived next to fracked gas wells during their pregnancies are more likely to have a low birth weight. That’s the finding of a new study from Princeton University. Researchers compared standard birth-weight records collected by Pennsylvania h

The Grant Town Power Plant is in the middle of a contentious argument at the West Virginia Public Service Commission. (Edison International)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The Monongahela Power Company is asking ratepayers to pay more to bail out a Marion County power plant that critics charge is dirty, already expensive and damaging to the air, land and water. Customers currently pay a bit above the market rate for the Grant Town Power Pla

Comments from the public moved several Republican lawmakers in West Virginia to break with their party and vote against a controversial pollution bill. (W. Va. Legislature)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- House Bill 2506 - nicknamed the "Cancer Creek Bill" by its critics - passed the West Virginia House of Delegates last week, but not before a public outcry pushed several delegates to oppose it. The bill would permit more pollution in surface waters by changing how the state me

New testing is finding unexpected levels of mildly radioactive materials in Marcellus drill cuttings. (EPA)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – New testing is finding unpredictable levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials in the waste from a Marcellus well. Gas wells in the region produce millions of tons of drill cuttings a year. These normally contain small amounts of uranium and other mildly radioac

Utilities in southern coastal states are cleaning up the coal ash left from decades of power generation. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — As Congress debates the issue, utilities and communities in southeastern states are moving ahead with clean up of millions of tons of coal ash in impoundments at power plants. Until recently, Congress had been deadlocked regarding this legacy of a coal-powered century. In

The disposal of low-level radioactive waste derived from Marcellus and Utica shale in Kentucky landfills is raising red flags. (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

CHARLESTON W.Va. - The paper trail of a company that dumped West Virginia radioactive frack waste into Kentucky landfills is raising serious questions. This spring, regulators cited Advanced TENORM Services for dumping the low-level radioactive waste in two municipal landfills. Not long after, the c

An environmental group will be in West Virginia this week with a thermal imaging camera to document normally invisible pollution. (Earthworks/Youtube)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Armed with a specialized thermal imaging camera, a group is traveling in the West Virginia Marcellus fields this week documenting natural gas leaks and pollution. Nadia Steinzor, eastern program coordinator for Earthworks, says the environmental group bought a forward loo

West Virginians say news of lead contamination in the drinking water of Flint, Mich., is painfully familiar. (Friends of Water)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Nearly 40 West Virginia groups are sending an open letter to the people of Flint, Michigan saying they know what it's like to have contaminated drinking water. When the news leaked that Flint's water has high levels of lead, many folks in Charleston immediately thought of the

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