Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 25, 2018 


President Trump loses another round in court on immigrant “dreamers.” Also on today’s rundown: Environmentalists tell New York Gov. Cuomo to match words with action; California lawmakers wear jeans, taking a stand against sexual violence; and Airbnb is called out for “secret tax deals.”

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Cultural Resources

The outdoor recreation industry says public lands are key to West Virginia's economic future.<br />(Birthplace of Rivers/Sam Taylor)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – With the Trump administration shrinking national monuments out West, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., remains evasive about the public lands some say could be key to West Virginia's future. The U.S. Interior Department announced late last year that it is shrinking two Utah nat

PHOTO: Poet Kane Smego is coming to Charleston this week to address a conference of Social Workers. He says says he'll talk about a central part of his work - teaching young people how to use spoken word performances to better understand themselves and others. Photo courtesy of Smego.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Poetry is a tool that can help young people break out of isolation, according to the keynote speaker at a conference of social workers this week. Spoken word artist Kane Smego plans to talk to folks about how it works Wednesday morning during the annual spring conference

PHOTO: Many say West Virginia's history has been in part defined by African-American history, starting with the role of slavery in the civil war, but later including early integration in the coalfields. Photo from the Library of Congress.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – As West Virginia celebrates its 150th birthday, a series of events will highlight how African-American history is central to the state’s story. The Rev. Ron English of Charleston says the state might not even exist if everyone had accepted slavery. He says the fron

Blair Mountain with adjacent mountaintop removal mine. Photo by Kenneth King courtesy of Friends of Blair Mountain.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The fight over preserving the Blair Mountain battlefield is not over, according to the environmental and labor history groups trying to protect the site. Last week a federal judge ruled the groups don't have the right to sue to have Blair Mountain returned to the National Registe

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A powerful art exhibit opening in West Virginia this week is intended to bring home the cost of the Afghan war to the civilians in that country. Prominent Chicago mural artist John Pittman Weber helped organize "Windows and Mirrors" for the American Friends Service Committee. W

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The "99 Percent - Occupy Everywhere" movement has spread to hundreds of cities, including several in West Virginia. An international researcher of social health statistics says the protesters have a point: Great inequality is bad for everyone in a society. Richard Wilkinson, pro

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The last 10 years in West Virginia have seen a rise in interfaith dialogue, often in direct response to the backlash against Muslims here and in other parts of the nation. After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, members of the Islamic Mosque in Charleston expected backlash

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - One big topic this week at the annual conference of the National Association of Social Workers West Virginia Chapter in Charleston is a discussion of ideas that could help both social work professionals and parents in dealing with children. A workshop by Jim Harris, a social work

1 of 4 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »