Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 19, 2018 


It will be up to the U.S. Senate today to take the next step, if a government shutdown is to be averted; also in focus on our Friday rundown, President Trump extends Religious-Refusal Protections to health providers; and, we will tell you about a 15 year old in North Carolina who just formed a Political Action Committee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Environment

The Colorado River, currently enduring a 17-year drought, supplies drinking water to some 40 million people and drives $1.4 trillion in economic activity across seven states. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Wyoming lawmakers heard arguments on Friday for contributing some $73 million toward a dam project in the southwestern part of the state. Water developers say a 280-foot-tall dam on the West Fork of Battle Creek would ultimately contribute an equal amount in public benefits,

Wyoming's sagebrush sea is home to the iconic bird known for its bold mating rituals, as well as elk, pronghorn and golden eagles. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – The Bureau of Land Management is taking public comments in Cheyenne Monday on potential changes to sage grouse habitat protection plans finalized under the Obama administration. The Trump administration's efforts could pave the way for more oil and gas development. Gov. Ma

The BLM has been asked to quantify how much CO2 would be released by mining projects in its Environmental Impact Statements. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – At least 30 coal workers could get to keep their jobs after a U.S. District Court ruled this week that Signal Peak Energy can continue operations near Billings, Mont. The decision allows Signal to mine 170,000 tons of coal, but the company can't move it or sell it until the B

In the time since Jonah Energy started inspecting for and repairing leaks, methane emissions dropped by 75 percent and the company saved $5 million worth of natural gas. (Getty Images)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – As the Trump administration makes good on its promises to roll back protections in the energy sector, mineral-rights owners are looking to state governments to help save royalty earnings from natural-gas reserves. Maggie McKenzie, a land and mineral-rights owner in southeast

Buttes surrounding Whitehorse Creek Basin on BLM-managed lands in southwestern Wyoming rise as much as 650 feet above the basin floor. (Leslie Duncan)

ROCK SPRINGS, Wyo. – Low-impact recreation on Wyoming public lands - such as camping, hiking, hunting and fishing - is a significant economic driver in surrounding communities. That's according to a new study by the independent firm ECONorthwest. Report author Kristin Lee says in 2015, publi

Mule deer herds have declined by 40 percent around the heavily developed gas fields near Pinedale. (Getty Images)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- With hunting season just around the corner, the sportswomen's group Artemis is making the case that keeping habitat viable for the greater sage grouse also will be good for mule deer populations. The group's new report, "Living on Common Ground," co-produced with the National Wil

One in five hunters is a woman, as is one in four of the nation's anglers, but they're rarely leaders of sporting conservation campaigns. (Courtesy of Jessi Johnson)

LANDER, Wyo. – Artemis, a new sportswomen's coalition, was officially launched Wednesday. Founded by women from six Western states, Artemis aims to defend public lands and waters and iconic species, and to develop female leaders in wildlife and land-management fields. Jessi Johnson, the gro

Clearing federal permitting hurdles is a big challenge for delivering Wyoming's renewable energy to markets across state lines. (Getty Images)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Wyoming is again at a crossroads when it comes to helping the nation meet its energy needs, according to an investigative report by the Casper Star Tribune. Reporter Heather Richards, who interviewed state and industry leaders along with academic experts, found demand for Wy

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