PNS Daily Newscast - March 19, 2018 

Facebook under the gun for failing to disclose misused data of 50 million Americans during the 2016 election. Also, on our Monday nationwide rundown; a new study shows e-cigarettes are harmful to teens; and it is Poison Prevention Week – a good time to dispel some myths.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Water

The Colorado River, currently enduring a 17-year drought, supplies drinking water to some 40 million people and drives $1.4 trillion in economic activity across seven states. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Wyoming lawmakers heard arguments on Friday for contributing some $73 million toward a dam project in the southwestern part of the state. Water developers say a 280-foot-tall dam on the West Fork of Battle Creek would ultimately contribute an equal amount in public benefits,

A study shows that half the world's drinking water, supplied by mountaintops, is threatened by climate change. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – As Congress moves to take the brakes off clean-water and climate-pollution protections, a new study published in the journal Nature shows water from the Rocky Mountains - and mountains around the globe - are threatened by climate change. Nathan Sanders, an ecologist at the U

A new report calls for restricting the use of antibiotics in factory-farmed animals to curb the global spread of infections. (MercyforAnimals/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – A new report calls for banning or restricting the use of antibiotics in farm animals to curb the global spread of infections. Cameron Harsh, senior manager for organic and animal policy with the environmental advocacy group Center for Food Safety, explains continuously dosin

Coal companies filing for bankruptcy could put taxpayers on the hook for cleanup costs. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Coal companies filing for bankruptcy could put taxpayers on the hook for cleanup costs. According to analysts, state and federal regulators failed to ensure that self-bonded companies had sufficient and enforceable resources for restoration. Fifty U.S. coal companies have filed for

Stanford University researchers have confirmed that hydraulic fracturing practices impacted a source of drinking water in the town of Pavillion, Wyo. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - A Stanford University report has confirmed that toxic fracking chemicals ended up in a Wyoming town's source of drinking water, and suggests common industry practices may have widespread impacts. The study examined sites near the town of Pavillion, Wyo., and found evidence of flu

Conservationists are concerned upper-basin state efforts to divert water could hurt ecosystems dependent on the Colorado River. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Wyoming has moved one step closer to getting more water for ranching, agriculture and industrial development. The U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources has advanced a bill that would allow the state to take an additional 125,000 acre-feet of water from the Green River at the F

State regulators voted against allowing the injection of oil and gas wastewater into the Madison Aquifer, a future source of drinking water. (Matthew Bowden/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wy. - The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to deny Aethon Energy's request for an exemption allowing them to dispose millions of barrels of oil and gas wastewater into a portion of the Madison Aquifer. The aquifer underlies Montana, Nebraska, North and

A warming planet could put water supplies at risk for Rocky Mountain states. (Hamid Soufi/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Surface temperatures across the globe in 2015 were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And 15 of the 16 warmest years on record have occurred since the new ce

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