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PNS Daily Newscast - November 25, 2020 


Feeding hungry families, on Thanksgiving and beyond; and is that turkey really from a family farm? (Note to Broadcasters: The newscast has been granted a holiday for Thanksgiving, but we'll return first thing Friday.)


2020Talks - November 25, 2020 


Biden nominees speak; how can social media spread less misinformation and be less polarizing.

Great Lakes Need a Budget Splash, Not a Sprinkle, Advocates Say

February 8, 2007


Great Lakes advocates are calling for full federal funding of clean water and invasive species initiatives -- and they say the White House budget shortchanges most of them.

Jeff Skelding of the Healing Our Waters Coalition says the lakes need big help with pollution and invasive species problems, but the new Bush administration budget proposal would cut programs that are already underfunded. He says that's bad news for Wisconsin's quality of life, as well as its economy.

"Public health will suffer, and also the recreation industry in the Great Lakes, which is an enormous economic engine that drives all the states in the basin. We're going to see diminished recreational, hunting, and angling opportunities."

Poor water quality and invasive species affect more than just the coastlines of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan. Their impact reaches into Wisconsin's inland rivers and lakes as well. Skelding says Congress has a chance to do more for the Great Lakes in the upcoming budget debates.

And Emily Green of the Sierra Club says the state also needs help preserving fish habitats and replacing outdated sewage treatment plants. Again, she feels the budget falls short on both counts.

"I think everyone agrees it's important to keep untreated sewage out of our water -- and the Great Lakes are a source of drinking water for 35-million people. The White House budget fails to keep pace with the comprehensive effort that's really needed to restore the Great Lakes."

The budget battle now goes to Congress, which Green says should give lawmakers the chance to shore up federal efforts to protect the Great Lakes watershed.

Rob Ferrett/Jamie Folsom, Public News Service - WI