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The U.S. Supreme Court rules against rogue 2016 Electoral College voters; SBA pandemic aid goes to companies that don't pledge to save or create jobs.

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Biden's climate change task force is making some progress; a federal judge orders the Dakota Access Pipeline shut down; and today sees elections in NJ and DE.

Baseball Keeps Kids Reading During the "Off-Season"

May 29, 2007


Boston, MA - What won't a kid do for Red Sox tickets? They will read nine books over the summer. The Red Sox Reading Game kicks off its seventh season today (TUESDAY). An expected 30-thousand or so kids will read a book for every position on the baseball field for a shot at winning tickets to a game. Comments from Kim Auger, 2nd grade teacher at the Parlin School in Everett, and Anne Wass, president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association.

Some Massachusetts students are stepping up to the plate this summer - pledging to read nine books each, for the chance at winning Red Sox tickets. It's all part of the Red Sox Reading Game, which kicks off its seventh year today. Thirty-thousand kids from kindergarten to eighth grade took part last year, reading one book for every position on the baseball field. Kim Auger, a second grade teacher at the Parlin School in Everett, says all of her students are joining in the contest.

"It's funny, because even the girls, you expect the baseball to be aimed towards the boys, but the girls just pick up a book and they just go in so many different directions with it."


The winners will get to go to a game over Labor Day weekend. Five grand prize winners will get to go on the field in pre-game and get a baseball signed by catcher Jason Varitek, spokesman for the contest.

Anne Wass, president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association, says the program keeps kids at the top of their game when they return in the fall.

"If you've kept reading over the summer, you can come in and kind of just pick up from where you've taken off."


Wass can be reached at (617) 878-8214.

Kevin Clay/Eric Mack, Public News Service - MA