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PNS Daily Newscast - May 24, 2019 


President Trump's reported to be ready to sign disaster relief bill without money for border security. Also on the Friday rundown: House bills would give millions a path to citizenship; and remembering California’s second-deadliest disaster.

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How Walkable Neighborhoods Help Iowa and Help Save the Planet

September 20, 2007

Des Moines, IA - A team of leading researchers has concluded that the easiest way to reduce our dependency on automobiles, conserve fuel, lessen our carbon footprints, and maybe even help Iowa's population, is to design and build walkable neighborhoods.

According to a new report from the Urban Land Institute, if urban sprawl continues at current rates, our total miles driven will increase nearly 60 percent by 2030. Building walkable communities might also help keep people in the state and attract newcomers. David Goldberg with Smart Growth America says the report found we can easily save money on fuel and provide alternatives to driving by designing neighborhoods where everything is within walking distance.

"What the report found was that within well designed compact developments people drive about a third less than they would ordinarily."

Stephanie Weisenbach with the group 1000 Friends of Iowa says we need decision-makers on the local, state and federal level to plan communities that give residents the option of walking, biking or taking public transit to get where they need to go.

"Building communities that encourage people to spend less time behind the wheel benefits our health, our pocketbooks and reduces greenhouse gases."

Weisenbach says using smart growth strategies today will reduce our reliance on foreign oil far into the future without requiring any expensive technological investments, considering that what is built starting now will account for two-thirds of housing by the year 2050.

A copy of the full report, "Growing Cooler: The Evidence on Urban Development and Climate Change" is on the Web at www.smartgrowthamerica.org.

Dick Layman/Chris Thomas, Public News Service - IA