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PNS Daily Newscast - January 18, 2020 


The pandemic isn't stopping MLK Day celebrations of justice, equality and public service; the Maryland Justice Program fights for a women's pre-release program.


2021Talks - January 18, 2021 


Quiet weekend; Kamala Harris set to resign from U.S. Senate; Biden announces ambitious plans for his first 10 days; and Lindsey Graham has warnings for both President and President-elect.

Fear of “Fatal Flubs” Silencing NH Primary Candidates

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November 15, 2007

Manchester, NH – A report being released in Manchester today says fewer than 40 percent of the Presidential candidates have the courage to answer tough questions about the issues. Anne Miller of New Hampshire Peace Action says others seem to be targeting their answers to narrow groups of voters.

"Some of the candidates are talking about these issues, they're just not talking about them in alignment with what the majority of Americans want, especially with the war and occupation of Iraq."

Project Vote Smart is announcing the results of its "Political Courage Test" this morning. Organizers say it rates candidates on whether they're willing to give answers that their handlers might not consider "safe."

Mike Wessler with the group says candidates told them they were afraid opponents would use the information against them, and they wanted to have more control over their message. He says voters shouldn't buy those excuses.

"While I do understand those concerns, I think they are minor compared to the importance of getting voters information about where candidates stand on these issues."

John Robinson, Public News Service - NH