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2020Talks

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PNS Daily Newscast - October 1, 2020 


Concern that Trump's Proud Boys comments could encourage "alt-right" groups; report finds key swing states went into manufacturing decline pre-pandemic.


2020Talks - October 1, 2020 


Experts are concerned about white supremacist violence leading up to the election. And, the Presidential Debate Commission says they plan to change rules after Trump's almost constant interruptions.

Report: Cleaner Cars Looking for a “Green Light” from IL

April 2, 2008

Springfield, IL – Cleaner cars need a green light from Illinois. The new Illinois Climate Action Network coalition of health, faith, and environmental groups is working on ways to battle global warming, and the proposed Illinois Clean Cars Act is seen as one of the keys to success.

The coalition has also published a report about how reducing the pollution from car and truck tailpipes which contributes to global warming at the same time helps people to breathe easier. Illinois Environmental Council executive director Jonathan Goldman thinks this approach can also help.

"We'll see fewer people suffering asthma attacks, less school absenteeism for kids because of asthma, and fewer premature deaths."

Goldman says the report also shows there are economic benefits to cleaner cars, with reduced health care costs and savings at the gas pump.

"One of the ways that cars are made less polluting is by making them more efficient. They burn less gasoline which means that we don't have to fill up the gas tank so often."

The report notes that Illinois has one of the highest asthma death rates in the country. The Illinois Clean Cars Act would reduce the most harmful air pollution by up to 16 percent. The Act is modeled after similar laws in other states, such as California. It faces opposition from some auto manufacturers who contend it could compromise safety.

Deborah Smith/Don Mathisen, Public News Service - IL