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Inauguration yields swift action: Joe Biden becomes 46th president and Kamala Harris vice president -- the first woman, African-American, and person of South Indian descent in this role. Harris seats new senators; Biden signs slew of executive actions and gets first Cabinet confirmation through the Senate.

Revolution Rally Looks to Help MA Weather a Dark Winter

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November 25, 2008

Boston, MA – More jobs, more money in Bay Stater pockets, and warmer homes. Those are three goals included in the state's new "energy empowerment declaration," endorsed by labor and environmental groups, political leaders and faith communities.

Clean Water Action has signed on to the document, and Co-Executive Director Cindy Luppi says there is urgency to get homes weather-tight with an expected colder-than-normal winter approaching.

"The time is now to invest in efficiency and weatherization. No one should have to make the choice between whether they’re going to heat their home or feed their family."

She says at a time of unstable energy prices, a shaky economy and growing levels of climate change pollution, the timing is right for an investment in weatherization for homes and businesses.

"This is also about creating jobs that benefit on multiple layers: reduce pollution, keep people warm, and keep energy dollars in our local economy."

Money for the projects could come from the state, the federal government and from the energy companies themselves, according to Luppi.

Critics of the idea point out that state and federal budgets are already in negative territory, so investment money is not available.

Deborah Smith/Deb Courson, Public News Service - MA