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PNS Daily Newscast - April 9, 2020 


Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders suspends his campaign for president. And COVID-19 is ravaging the black community in some areas, including Milwaukee.

2020Talks - April 9, 2020 


Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders drops out of the race for president, though he assured supporters yesterday his movement will continue. A federal judge ruled this week a lawsuit in Florida awaiting trial will apply to all people with former felony convictions, not just the 17 plaintiffs.

Holidays and Hard Times: a Depression Double Whammy

December 15, 2008

Tucson, AZ – The holiday season can be a time of great joy and happiness. But for some, it can bring on serious bouts of depression, especially in the current economic downturn. Physician Laura Waterman, clinical director for the Southern Arizona Mental Health Center, Tucson, says the stress of the season can bring down even people who are not generally depressed otherwise.

"The expectations for a perfect holiday that people set for themselves can be pretty unrealistic: the perfect holiday dinner, the perfect gifts for every person, the perfect reaction from everyone to whom you give the perfect gift."

Waterman says such depression can produce thoughts of suicide, in extreme cases. She recommends seeking professional treatment or, at the very least, an assessment. The warning signs of holiday depression include major changes in sleeping and eating habits, she adds.

"Or it might be a sense of hopelessness and sadness, suddenly not being at all interested in activities that previously were very interesting and enjoyable."

For less-serious depression, Waterman advises a visit to a primary care doctor or clinic; in a critical situation, the person should contact one of the crisis centers located in each Arizona county.

"A good place to try and find that crisis system is to look in the yellow pages under 'crisis services.' Sometimes, it's at the very front of the phone book, under emergency numbers."

Contacting a religious counselor is another good place to start, she suggests. In extreme situations, when someone is threatening to harm themselves or others, she advises calling the police because they can help facilitate an emergency hospital admission.

Doug Ramsey, Public News Service - AZ