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PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

Daily Newscasts

Subtle Changes Can Make a Healthy New Year

December 31, 2008

Columbus, OH - Many Ohioans will ring in the New Year with resolutions to lose unwanted pounds or quit smoking. But if you want your resolution to stick, experts say, you should focus on small lifestyle changes to improve your overall health, instead of quick fixes that won't last.

Tracey Hopkins with the Ohio Division of the American Cancer Society says such small changes are the easiest way to put yourself on a path to healthier living.

"Be a little more active every day than you were the day before or even the week before. Even challenge yourself to do the five-a-day, so you are incorporating more fruits and vegetables into your diet." The five-a-day campaign refers to servings of fruits and vegetables.

Hopkins also recommends trying "The Great American Health Check" - an online tool with information about how to lose weight and stop smoking for good, reducing the risk of cancer and other diseases. Hopkins says counting calories is an important step to weight loss, but it's also essential to chose the right foods for better health.

"It's not just about dieting, it's more about the wellness, how it makes you feel when you do eat better. And we do know that a lot of the vitamins in the fruits and vegetables do help to prevent cancer. The Health Check does create awareness and gives people a goal to strive for, and then when they get that personalized action plan e-mailed to them, it will make some suggestions."

Experts say too often people set goals that are unrealistic and nearly impossible to reach. Hopkins says The Great American Health Check help individuals to recognize habits that may need to be changed. It's available online at
www.cancer.org/healthcheck

Mary Kuhlman/Elizabeth Grattan, Public News Service - OH