PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 7, 2020 


The State Attorney of NY moves to dissolve the NRA; an update on the potential wave of pandemic evictions.


2020Talks - August 7, 2020 


The Commission on Presidential Debates rejects Trump campaign's request for a fourth debate. Hawaii has a primary tomorrow, but there are only 8 vote service centers.

Help Available for Coloradans with Questions on the DTV Switch

March 5, 2009

Denver, CO - It's not as easy as just flipping a switch. In fact, the switch to digital television can be downright confusing for many Coloradans, including some of those over age 50 who are more likely to depend on that old analog TV set for critical information. AARP-Colorado spokesperson Morie Smile says the advocacy group for senior citizens is receiving plenty of questions from consumers, such as "How do I get a converter box?", "Do I need a converter box?", "Where are the coupons?" and "How do I hook it up?"

She says AARP has responded by setting up a toll-free hotline for conversion enquiries at 877-698-8068. Information is also online at www.aarp.org/dtv.

The official date when all over-the-air television stations must be broadcasting solely in digital has been pushed back to June 12, but some stations already are making the switch, and there's no guarantee the old analog signals will be broadcast in an area until then, Smile says.

"In Denver, in Colorado Springs and I believe on the Western Slope, we've seen stations already starting to make this shift."

Smile warns that Coloradans over 50, especially the elderly, tend to be more isolated and rely more heavily on broadcast TV as a lifeline to their community.

"That's why it's so important that we do everything we can to make sure these are the people who have access to the converter boxes and the information."


Eric Mack, Public News Service - CO