PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 28, 2020 


The New York Times reports President Trump's tax returns show chronic losses; and will climate change make it as a topic in the first presidential debate?


2020Talks - September 28, 2020 


The New York Times obtains President Trump's tax returns, showing chronic loss and debts coming due. And Judge Amy Coney Barrett is Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Wide Gap in "Green Grades" for NY State Senators

May 20, 2010

ALBANY, N.Y. - Environmental advocates have issued mid-term "green" grades for New York State senators, and the gap between Democrats and Republicans is as high as ever. Concerns over environmental budget cutting in New York has prompted environmental advocates to take the unusual step. Deep cuts are proposed to both the Department of Environmental Conservation and to New York State Parks. 29 of the Senators earned failing grades.

Rob Moore, executive director of EPL-Environmental Advocates, believes the scores reflect a partisan divide, with 23 Democratic senators scoring 90 and above for their support of major environmental bills.

"On the Republican side, they're not doing very well; the conference average is at 48 and almost 90 percent of their members are earning failing grades this year."

Democratic senators with poor grades pulled the party's average down to 86 this year. Moore says support for pending initiatives like the Global Warming Pollution Control Act could help all senators increase their final green grades.

The ongoing budget crisis makes it all the more important that lawmakers stand up for the environment, says Moore. The current budget proposes cutting Department of Education by one percent and the Department of Health by two percent, while the cuts to the environment are 15 times that amount, he adds.

"Most state agencies are being asked to absorb cuts in this budget of one to two percent per year, however environmental agencies, like the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Office of Parks, are looking at cuts of 34 percent and 25 percent respectively. That's way out of proportion with what other state agencies are being asked to sacrifice."

Both the New York League of Conservation Voters and Long Island Environmental Voters Forum are using votes on the state budget as a way of measuring lawmakers performance on environmental issues this session.

You can learn how your lawmaker scored on the web at www.eplvotersguide.org.


Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NY